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SABI Learning Review: Triggering Citizen Action

SABI is a programme operating in all 16 districts of Sierra Leone to increase citizen demands to their governments for the delivery of basic services. This learning review asked the question – has SABI succeeded in supporting community citizen action for effective governance and improved public services? It draws on SABI’s database of 786 community action plans, and interviews and groups discussions with implementing partners, youth accountability volunteers and community members.

The new global debt crisis

Spiralling debt repayments divert precious resources from governments that can ill afford to spare them. Without spending money on basic services like clean water, sanitation and health, there is little hope of poor countries meeting the development need, and human rights, of their citizens.  This report explores the current debt crisis, its risks, and ways to tackle it. Produced as part of the Citizens for Financial Justice project

The Big Shift: Banks - campaign briefing

Get powered up for climate justice. Find out how banks are fuelling climate change, and how they could be a key part of the solution.

Fair and equitable research partnerships case study: Eric Gutierrez

Funding for research in international development often includes a focus on fair and equitable partnerships. Academics from the global North are increasingly encouraged by funders to include academic partners based in the global South and civil society practitioners in their research projects. But achieving this is complicated: partnership and research are both political. This case study is one of a set of resources that has been designed to help academics, NGOs, CSOs, research brokers and funders put principles for fair and equitable research partnerships into practice. The case study explores insights from Eric Gutierrez of Christian Aid, who was involved in a successful application to the Global Challenges Research Fund for a research project looking at the way economies transition from war to peace. The project is led by SOAS University of London, a respected UK university. Christian Aid became involved in the project because it had previously worked with SOAS to commission research. In this case study, Eric reflects on the experience of being involved in the research application process. He talks about the time and work involved in the application, the challenges of tight deadlines, and the structural barriers that limited Christian Aid’s role. He discusses on Christian Aid’s experience in lobbying for policy change, and how this kind of work can be overlooked by academic actors with less experience of ensuring that research leads to policy change.

Fair and equitable research partnerships case study: Kate Newman

Funding for research in international development often includes a focus on fair and equitable partnerships. Academics from the global North are increasingly encouraged by funders to include academic partners based in the global South and civil society practitioners in their research projects. But achieving this is complicated: partnership and research are both political. This case study is one of a set of resources that has been designed to help academics, NGOs, CSOs, research brokers and funders put principles for fair and equitable research partnerships into practice. The case study explores insights from Kate Newman of Christian Aid, who reflects on her experience of participating in an moderator panel for the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC), convened to make funding recommendations to the AHRC based on a ‘Network Plus’ call funded by the Global Challenges Research Fund. It was Kate’s first time on an academic moderator panel, and she found the experience very challenging. She was not clear about her specific role on the panel (was she there to represent a civil society voice, or as an individual participating in a panel?), there were no clear criteria against which the proposals should be evaluated, and there were vastly different expectations of academic research and development impact across the panel. Kate asks questions and makes recommendations for future panels to enable better participation of civil society representatives on similar panels.

Christian Aid Ireland’s adaptive programme management

Governance, gender, peace building and human rights Tackling the problems of poverty, vulnerability and exclusion that persist in parts of the world that continue to be affected by violence or political insecurity is difficult for several reasons. For one, because of the complexity of the prevailing social, economic and political systems, solutions to chronic problems are far from obvious. One response to this aspect of the challenge is adaptive programme design and management. This paper, 'Learning to make a difference: Christian Aid Ireland’s adaptive programme management in governance, gender, peace building and human rights', is the product of a multi-year collaboration between ODI and the core team of Christian Aid Ireland to assess the relevance of adaptive or trial-and-error approaches to the field of governance, peace building and human rights. It explains the basis on which Christian Aid Ireland’s current five-year programme funded by Irish Aid has become committed to an adaptive approach. It then describes and seeks to draw lessons from the programme’s first year of experience, considering the possible implications for implementation over the coming years.

Partnership for Change: Christian Aid in Sierra Leone

Christian Aid’s Sierra Leone programme started in 1988 with a focus on service delivery and humanitarian assistance. Since the civil war ended in 2002, we have had a greater emphasis on building the capacity of local partners to challenge the systems and structures that perpetuate poverty and inequality. Our vision is a Sierra Leone where poor and marginalised women and men have equal access to resources and services and thrive within a responsible state.

Sierra Leone: women and politics - qualitative participatory research

A participatory governance assessment in Sierra Leone, focused on Christian Aid’s partner SEND and its women in governance project in Kailahun district.

Sierra Leone: assessment of governance programming methodology

This guidance document provides an introduction to the overall approach for the assessment; an overview of methods used; and issues for consideration when using these or similar methods.  It is based on the consultants’ experience of carrying out the assessment in Kailahun, Sierra Leone over five and a half days in September 2015. The methods section contains an introduction to each method, notes about facilitation, and identification of some benefits of use.    Please note, this document is not intended to be a comprehensive set of guidelines on delivering these methods. It is an accompaniment to the main report, Stand strong: women and politics, Kailahun, Sierra Leone. Both are part of Christian Aid’s 2015 impact assessment on governance programming. Related resources Sierra Leone: women and politics - qualitative participatory research

Sierra Leone - strengthening health systems parliamentary briefing

Discussed during parliamentary debate in 2014 on strengthening health systems in developing countries and development in Sierra Leone and Liberia.

The ENCISS Story 2010 - 2014

A summary report including achievements, lessons learnt and case studies from the ENCISS programme.

Humanitarian briefing paper - Ebola crisis (2014)

This briefing outlines the global health crisis posed by the Ebola outbreak, its impact and the action needed to curtail the growing crisis.  

SMS Voices: a community reporting project

SMS Voices is a pioneering governance pilot project launched by ENCISS in January 2014, designed to encourage transparent dialogue between citizens and local councillors through a custom-built SMS (text message) system.

The ENCISS story: 2010-2014

ENCISS aims to improve accountability and strengthen citizens’ voice, participation in decision-making and access to information. Between October 2010 and September 2013 we awarded 243 grants, worth £3.8m, to a host of organisations. These micro, strategic and project grants went to groups of all shapes and sizes, including civil society organisations  (CSOs) and local councils, to fund initiatives across the ENCISS thematic areas: gender, youth, justice, decentralisation and the 2012 elections. Here we capture stories from phase 3 of the ENCISS programme from across these core theme areas.

Losing out: Sierra Leone's massive revenue losses from tax incentives 

The first attempt in Sierra Leone to analyse the government's 'tax expenditure', showing these revenue losses are extremely large.