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Modern Slavery Statement

Christian Aid's Modern Slavery Statement

Black Lives Matter Everywhere

Apart from the Covid-19 pandemic, the rise of the Black Lives Matter movement has been one of the defining themes of 2020. Sparked by the death of George Floyd and other examples of police brutality in the United States, it quickly spread to include a wider debate about racial inequalities around the world. Climate change, although something which will affect us all, is a deeply racialised phenomenon. Black and brown people in the poorest countries face the brunt of the impacts, caused in large part by fossil fuel burning in rich, majority-White nations. But this inequality is often overlooked because climate change is associated with science and the language used to describe it is often technical jargon relating to atmospheric carbon atoms and global temperature readings. The cold neutrality of climate science obscures the fact that the drivers and impacts of the climate emergency are personal and societal, and tied to political decisions with clear racial implications. People in the, as-yet, more sheltered corners of the global North are now starting to experience the force of the climate crisis, but across the global South it is something they have already been feeling the effects of for years. Be they extreme weather events in Latin America, droughts in East Africa, floods in Bangladesh or sea level rise threatening the existence of Pacific Islands, climate change is not just a future threat but a present reality. Climate change and its disproportionate effects on those that have done the least to cause it has been known about for decades. And yet emissions continue to rise. If poor political decisions and unjust policies have helped to cause the climate crisis, then it’s equally the case that the right policies and decisions have an essential role to play in addressing the problem and putting the world on a path to climate justice. We’re beginning to see such movement, although not nearly fast enough. Politicians around the world have claimed to be moved by racial injustice. Making rapid and far reaching climate action a priority would be a good start in ensuring black lives matter everywhere.

Fumes or Futures assembly powerpoint

This powerpoint on climate change accompanies the Fumes or Futures assemblies resource.

Fumes or Futures: game instructions

These instructions explain how to play the Fumes or Futures board game. (Game board and cards downloadable as separate resources). 

Fumes or Futures: game board

This board accompanies the Fumes or Futures game. Please note, this should be printed A3 size.

Fumes or Futures: game cards

These game cards accompany the Fumes or Futures game.

Fumes or Futures poster

Fumes or Futures poster. Please note this should be printed A4 size.

Fumes or Futures assemblies

Climate change is the most pressing issue of our time. Engage your pupils on the topic with our Fumes or Futures assembly ideas.  These assemblies are designed to be adapted and used as a resource for either whole school, key stage or class assembly/collective worship. The materials could be used for a one-off assembly focusing on climate change, or as a series in which the themes are developed over the course of a week. You can use them alone, or as part of the Fumes or Futures pack, which includes games, case studies and teaching ideas.

Fumes or Futures teaching ideas

Climate change is the most pressing issue of our time. Engage your pupils on the topic with our Fumes or Futures teaching ideas.  The ideas span the subject areas of Geography, Maths, History, Science, English, Citizenship, RE and Art.  There are also short snippets from our global neighbours who are feeling the effects of climate change. 

Fumes or Futures chatterbox

Use our Fumes or Futures chatterbox to engage your pupils and help spread awareness of climate change.  The first level of the chatterbox shows the kind of natural disasters that are happening more often because of climate change. The second level suggests actions that that can help cut carbon emissions, and the last level explains what effect taking action could have. Space (in the dotted area) has been left for you to write in one of your own ideas about an action that could help reduce carbon emissions. Space (in the striped area) has been left for you to write in what effect that action could have.

Photo of Hamza

Use this image of young refugee and peacemaker Hamza to show alongside the Christmas Assembly.

Nelson Mandela assembly - English

Suitable for ages 7-14 Duration: 15 minutes An assembly on Nelson Mandela.

Crazy Climate facts activity sheet

Age: 7-11 A range of classroom activities based around these Crazy Climate facts. Pupils can: Put the facts into groups under headings like: reduce, recycle, reuse, save water, save energy, reduce CO2. You can also think of your own headings or sort them into problems and actions. Choose a fact. Work in pairs or small groups to think of ways to tell the rest of your school about the fact you have chosen. What do you think is the best way to do this? You could perform a play or assembly, or make a poster, a PowerPoint presentation or even a film. Make a tally chart to record your activities over a week that emit CO2, eg car journeys, hours watching TV, how long you charge your mobile phone for, etc. Plot your results on a graph to show your carbon footprint. Design and carry out a survey of your classmates to find out how eco-friendly they are.

Crazy Climate facts activity sheet - Welsh

Age: 7-11 A range of classroom activities based around these Crazy Climate facts. Pupils can: Put the facts into groups under headings like: reduce, recycle, reuse, save water, save energy, reduce CO2. You can also think of your own headings or sort them into problems and actions. Choose a fact. Work in pairs or small groups to think of ways to tell the rest of your school about the fact you have chosen. What do you think is the best way to do this? You could perform a play or assembly, or make a poster, a PowerPoint presentation or even a film. Make a tally chart to record your activities over a week that emit CO2, eg car journeys, hours watching TV, how long you charge your mobile phone for, etc. Plot your results on a graph to show your carbon footprint. Design and carry out a survey of your classmates to find out how eco-friendly they are.