Skip to main content

We found 17

Showing 1 - 17

Christian Aid in the Philippines: an exit learning review

Building climate resilience and strengthening civil society

Doing research ethically

A guide and toolkit for doing research and evaluation in an ethical way for international development practitioners and evaluators

South Africa learning review

Learning from our work in South Africa

Brumadinho Briefing Report

Ensuring justice for people and communities affected by the Brumadinho dam disaster.

Counting the cost 2020: a year of climate breakdown

Identifying 15 of the most destructive climate disasters of the year.

Research Design resource

This is a guide to help practitioners develop and design a research or evaluation project. It sets out different sections to fill out to help guide you through this process and includes further questions to help you think through the research design process in more detail.  

Attending a webinar

Christian Aid runs lots of webinars, online talks and training for our volunteers – but if you’ve never attended one before, you might be a little worried about what to expect.  In this handy guide, you’ll learn how to connect and participate in these online sessions, what you’ll see on your screen and where you can get further help.

A Rights-Based Economy Report

The COVID-19 pandemic has shone a spotlight on the fundamental injustice at the core of our current economic model, which results in scarcity for the many, and unimaginable wealth for the few. The economic fallout from the pandemic and the inadequacy of governments’ responses to it are prompting more and more people to question the morality of an economic system which for decades has placed the market at the centre of all human interactions, measuring progress and development solely in terms of economic growth. In this publication, the Center for Economic and Social Rights (CESR) and Christian Aid – two international organisations working for human rights and economic justice – ask: what would it would look like if we had an economy based on human rights?

Whose Green Recovery

A report outlining what a global green recovery would look like.

Building Back with Justice

Building Back with Justice sets out the actions governments must take to ensure that any global recovery from Covid-19 is one that tackles inequalities, addresses the climate crisis and sets us on a path to a different future.

Tipping Point report

This report explores how the Covid-19 pandemic threatens to push the world's poorest to the brink of survival.

Equality at All Levels report

A report from Christian Aid calling for faith actors and secular feminists to join forces to push for global equality for women.

Gender lens to the UN Treaty on Business and Human Rights briefing

In this briefing, ACT Alliance sets out its analysis and recommendations concerning the UN Treaty on Business and Human Rights ahead of the negotiations taking place in October 2019.  Business principles do not always converge with human rights principles. In various dimensions, from violence against women, to women’s economic participation, to tax, trade and investment, the gendered disparities are not resolved uniquely by market participation and growth dynamics. In fact, the growth-based model often puts women and other individuals who are marginalised in disadvantageous positions, ie, trapped in poverty, in unequal power relations and subject to abuse and violence. We believe that in order to ensure respect for human rights, we need binding rules on business and human rights at all levels, including respect for human rights, conducting meaningful human rights due diligence and adequate reporting, as well as access to remedy for victims of human rights abuses.

An economy of life briefing

An economy of life: How transforming the economy can tackle inequalities, bring climate justice and build a sustainable future Our vision is that global institutions genuinely represent and are accountable to the interests of everyone, not just the rich and powerful. This means confronting the institutional structures, including the World Bank and International Monetary Fund (IMF), cultural norms and power imbalances that work together to maintain the status quo. We need to look for new expressions of economic life. Measures of economic growth overlook human and environmental wellbeing. It is time re-evaluate. This briefing challenges the World Bank and IMF to be part of this change and to become of a progressive and positive force in an economic future that leaves no one behind and is beneficial for nature and the climate.

Syrian Civil Society: A closing door report

This report seeks to give a truer view of Syrian civil society, giving a voice to people who have often been mentioned only as a footnote to atrocities, as aid workers killed in a shelling, or vilified as terrorists in the narratives of the government and its allies. Since March 2011, Syria has experienced one of the bloodiest and cruellest conflicts of recent times. Hundreds of thousands have been killed and hundreds of thousands more injured.  But while these grim figures have been repeated in the western media frequently, less often told is the story of the Syrians who did everything in their power to counter this.  Against the backdrop of conflict arose an active Syrian civil society – Syrians on the ground who, more often than not, had no previous experience in this sector. Syrians who came from a society whose government allowed no space for civil society to grow: and yet it did. But as civil society’s space is being squeezed worldwide, to grasp the potential for Syrian civil society we must act now. The door is already closing and it will slam shut, returning the country to the pre-2011 hostile environment where civil society groups faced being shut down and their members and volunteers risked being arrested or imprisoned if they were perceived to challenge the state. This report is an appeal and a challenge. Will the international community support the Syrians who recognise the difficulty of the task they face?

Peace, illicit drugs and the SDGs - a development gap

The SDGs barely reach the places where peacebuilding is most urgent. Here, the illicit drug economy plays a complex, overlooked role in survival. 

HIV Related Stigma and Shame in Nigerian Faith Communities

There have been suggestions and clear indications that religion, with its potentials to influence behaviours, provides opportunity that can be leveraged on to achieve HIV prevention goal by involving religious leaders at the local level. There is also evidence suggesting that religious engagement presents important potential for improving physical and psychological health and well-being of people living with HIV as religious beliefs are seen to reduce depression, increase optimism and strength in dealing with a difficult life transition like HIV infection.     Faith leaders have the advantages of robust followership, an existing platform to reach people and access to resources beyond the immediate community. Religious leaders enjoy the respect as opinion leaders in their faith congregations and communities and have the opportunity to use the pulpit to challenge destructive prejudices that reinforce stigma, and at the same time convey important information to the population to improve uptake of HIV services as people tend to listen to what their faith leaders say. However, there have been concerns of high perceptions of stigma emanating from religious communities connected with the religious narratives that associate HIV infection to “sinful” sexual behaviour. This report presents findings from an assessment on the nature and predictors in Abuja, Anambra and Benue States on HIV related stigma, discrimination and shame in Nigerian Faith Communities and how Faith leader play an important role in reducing the stigma.