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Rise to the Moment Activity Pack

Create a prayer boat with your church ahead of COP26 to call for climate justice

Template letter for MPs: climate finance

Download the MS Word template letter for sending to MPs

Song of the Prophets - digital programme

The running order and reflections for the digital premiere of Song of the Prophets: a Requiem for the Climate.

Tea-time prayer resource

Say a tea-time prayer in solidarity with those experiencing the worst of climate injustice.

Bridging the gap

Fiscal justice in sexual and reproductive health and rights in Africa. 

MP Breifing: Climate and Debt 2021

Use this briefing to speak to your local MP about climate justice and debt cancellation

SCCS - Supporter guide to the Scottish Parliament Elections 2021

Stop Climate Chaos Scotland supporter guide for Scottish Parliament Elections.

Climate Finance Briefing for campaigners

Find out more about why money is at the heart of climate justice, and what action is needed

Thank you For the Rain - watch party and screening resource

The Thank You For The Rain documentary film is a great way to explore, facilitate discussions, and empower young people to act on issues of global social justice. Our Watch Party and Screening Guide helps you set up an engaging event.

'Thank You For The Rain' watch party guide

A practical guide for you to use this incredible film as a catalyst for action

Our Prophetic Journey Towards Climate Justice

Climate stories from black church leaders to inspire positive action.

Prayer points

To help you pray for climate justice in January

Black Lives Matter Everywhere

Apart from the Covid-19 pandemic, the rise of the Black Lives Matter movement has been one of the defining themes of 2020. Sparked by the death of George Floyd and other examples of police brutality in the United States, it quickly spread to include a wider debate about racial inequalities around the world. Climate change, although something which will affect us all, is a deeply racialised phenomenon. Black and brown people in the poorest countries face the brunt of the impacts, caused in large part by fossil fuel burning in rich, majority-White nations. But this inequality is often overlooked because climate change is associated with science and the language used to describe it is often technical jargon relating to atmospheric carbon atoms and global temperature readings. The cold neutrality of climate science obscures the fact that the drivers and impacts of the climate emergency are personal and societal, and tied to political decisions with clear racial implications. People in the, as-yet, more sheltered corners of the global North are now starting to experience the force of the climate crisis, but across the global South it is something they have already been feeling the effects of for years. Be they extreme weather events in Latin America, droughts in East Africa, floods in Bangladesh or sea level rise threatening the existence of Pacific Islands, climate change is not just a future threat but a present reality. Climate change and its disproportionate effects on those that have done the least to cause it has been known about for decades. And yet emissions continue to rise. If poor political decisions and unjust policies have helped to cause the climate crisis, then it’s equally the case that the right policies and decisions have an essential role to play in addressing the problem and putting the world on a path to climate justice. We’re beginning to see such movement, although not nearly fast enough. Politicians around the world have claimed to be moved by racial injustice. Making rapid and far reaching climate action a priority would be a good start in ensuring black lives matter everywhere.

Gender lens to the UN Treaty on Business and Human Rights briefing

In this briefing, ACT Alliance sets out its analysis and recommendations concerning the UN Treaty on Business and Human Rights ahead of the negotiations taking place in October 2019.  Business principles do not always converge with human rights principles. In various dimensions, from violence against women, to women’s economic participation, to tax, trade and investment, the gendered disparities are not resolved uniquely by market participation and growth dynamics. In fact, the growth-based model often puts women and other individuals who are marginalised in disadvantageous positions, ie, trapped in poverty, in unequal power relations and subject to abuse and violence. We believe that in order to ensure respect for human rights, we need binding rules on business and human rights at all levels, including respect for human rights, conducting meaningful human rights due diligence and adequate reporting, as well as access to remedy for victims of human rights abuses.

An economy of life briefing

An economy of life: How transforming the economy can tackle inequalities, bring climate justice and build a sustainable future Our vision is that global institutions genuinely represent and are accountable to the interests of everyone, not just the rich and powerful. This means confronting the institutional structures, including the World Bank and International Monetary Fund (IMF), cultural norms and power imbalances that work together to maintain the status quo. We need to look for new expressions of economic life. Measures of economic growth overlook human and environmental wellbeing. It is time re-evaluate. This briefing challenges the World Bank and IMF to be part of this change and to become of a progressive and positive force in an economic future that leaves no one behind and is beneficial for nature and the climate.