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Guidance on whistleblowing

It is the duty of every employee to speak up about genuine concerns in relation to criminal activity, breach of legal obligation (including negligence, breach of contract, breach of administrative law, miscarriage of justice, danger to health and safety or environment) and the cover up of any of these in the workplace. Christian Aid is committed to ensuring that any employee's concerns of this nature will be taken seriously and investigated, and as part of this commitment has developed this guidance note on whistleblowing.

Safeguarding policy

Christian Aid is committed to protecting the dignity and rights of every person, and works with those that are committed to supporting poor and marginalised communities to eradicate poverty and promote basic rights and justice. This includes the rights of

Building Back with Justice

Building Back with Justice sets out the actions governments must take to ensure that any global recovery from Covid-19 is one that tackles inequalities, addresses the climate crisis and sets us on a path to a different future.

Tipping Point report

This report explores how the Covid-19 pandemic threatens to push the world's poorest to the brink of survival.

Equality at All Levels report

A report from Christian Aid calling for faith actors and secular feminists to join forces to push for global equality for women.

How Christian Aid pays its staff

The effective stewardship of resources is core to the vision and values that underpin Christian Aid’s work in seeking to bring about a fairer, more equitable world. We recognise the important responsibility we have to the poor communities we work with, our donors, supporters and the general public, to ensure we are open and transparent on how we use the funds that are so generously donated for the work we undertake.  We are committed to ensuring value for money in everything we do and this includes how we remunerate our staff. We operate a policy that is fair, equitable and consistent to attract, motivate and retain capable staff that have the skills and experience we require to implement the work we do.  What are our pay principles? Our salaries are set within in a policy that reflects the values and ethos of the organisation, benchmarking against other comparable charities and church organisations at a level that is just below or at the median of these comparators. The basic principle for determining salaries is that employees carrying out the same or similar jobs in the same location are paid the same or similar salary. Salaries differ where jobs are of a different size, complexity, responsibility and accountability. Tackling global poverty and social injustice is highly complex and we value the contribution that each individual employee makes to our organisation’s success. Our approach to reward is guided by the following principles which are applied equally to all our staff wherever they are located and whatever their position:  We will provide a total reward package which recognises contribution to the achievement of our aims. Our reward offering will be competitive in the marketplace from which we draw the people we need.  The reward decisions we make will be consistent and based on objective assessment of our organisational needs.  Wherever we can we will offer flexibility and choice so that individuals can achieve what is most relevant and has most value to them.  We will make arrangements which comply fully with relevant legislation wherever we are operating. How is pay governed? The implementation of our remuneration policy, which is set by the Board, is overseen by the Remuneration Committee. This committee has delegated authority to provide governance oversight and input on all matters concerning the principles and policies governing the pay and benefits of Christian Aid staff. Its responsibilities include: To consider any suggested changes to those principles and policies and make recommendations to the Board. To make recommendations to the Board for any necessary adjustments, consistent with affordability within agreed budget parameters. To collect and consider evidence of movements in the external pay market as it affects Christian Aid, and to make recommendations to the Board for any necessary adjustments required to ensure Christian Aid is able to recruit and retain appropriately skilled staff to implement its strategy effectively. To make recommendations from time to time to the Board on the broad policy framework and overall costs of the remuneration of the Chief Executive and the Directors and to determine the salary of the Chief Executive. Our lower salary band for all employed staff in the UK and Ireland is above the Living Wage, as is the salary of all third party contracted cleaning staff employed in our UK and Ireland regional and national offices. Christian is an accredited “Living Wage Employer”. For salaries of staff based in the UK and Ireland, the Board has adopted the “Hutton Fair Pay Review” recommendation which limits the differential of pay between the highest paid person and others, using a ratio based on the median salary. The Board has set this ratio at 4:1 on UK salaries. The salaries for our internationally based staff are set within their local employment market, against a benchmark of other comparable organisations, consistent with our overall remuneration policy. Further information on what we currently spend on salaries, including the salary of the Chief Executive, can be found in our 2016/17 Annual Report. How much is Christian Aid’s Chief Executive paid? Christian Aid’s Chief Executive, Amanda Khozi Mukwashi, earned £132,000 last year. We recognise that this is a large sum of money. Christian Aid makes every effort to avoid paying higher salaries than are necessary. We pay our staff salaries the same as, or below, the median of other church-based and/or international development agencies. A recent survey of UK charities showed that we pay significantly below the average pay of £167,000 for CEO’s of the top 100 charities, in terms of income, in the country. The Chief Executive role carries an immense amount of responsibility. This includes the stewardship, governance and oversight of how we spend our £106m annual income, the welfare of up to 900 staff and the projects we support to help lift millions of people out of poverty. Within Christian Aid we are committed to the idea that transparency empowers – that’s why we’re already one of the most transparent organisations in the sector. We’ve always been clear on who earns what and we’re accredited with the highest international standards of transparency. How do we manage annual pay reviews? Each year, Christian Aid conducts an annual pay review of staff salaries. In the UK and Ireland we calculate inflation rates using the average of Average Weekly Earnings Index (AWE) and the Consumer Price Index (CPI). Any inflationary award or other necessary adjustments made on salaries are subject to affordability. For our internationally based staff we use country data from the International Monetary Fund (IMF) for calculating cost of living increases for country offices. Adjustments are implemented on April 1. Contact us

Gender lens to the UN Treaty on Business and Human Rights briefing

In this briefing, ACT Alliance sets out its analysis and recommendations concerning the UN Treaty on Business and Human Rights ahead of the negotiations taking place in October 2019.  Business principles do not always converge with human rights principles. In various dimensions, from violence against women, to women’s economic participation, to tax, trade and investment, the gendered disparities are not resolved uniquely by market participation and growth dynamics. In fact, the growth-based model often puts women and other individuals who are marginalised in disadvantageous positions, ie, trapped in poverty, in unequal power relations and subject to abuse and violence. We believe that in order to ensure respect for human rights, we need binding rules on business and human rights at all levels, including respect for human rights, conducting meaningful human rights due diligence and adequate reporting, as well as access to remedy for victims of human rights abuses.

An economy of life briefing

An economy of life: How transforming the economy can tackle inequalities, bring climate justice and build a sustainable future Our vision is that global institutions genuinely represent and are accountable to the interests of everyone, not just the rich and powerful. This means confronting the institutional structures, including the World Bank and International Monetary Fund (IMF), cultural norms and power imbalances that work together to maintain the status quo. We need to look for new expressions of economic life. Measures of economic growth overlook human and environmental wellbeing. It is time re-evaluate. This briefing challenges the World Bank and IMF to be part of this change and to become of a progressive and positive force in an economic future that leaves no one behind and is beneficial for nature and the climate.

Safeguarding policy, Portuguese (PDF)

Christian Aid is committed to protecting the dignity and rights of every person, and works with those that are committed to supporting poor and marginalised communities to eradicate poverty and promote basic rights and justice. This includes the rights of the children and adults. The guiding principle of our Safeguarding Policy, here translated into Portuguese, is that Christian Aid believes that it is always unacceptable for children, young people, or adults to experience any kind of abuse.

Safeguarding policy, French (PDF)

Christian Aid is committed to protecting the dignity and rights of every person, and works with those that are committed to supporting poor and marginalised communities to eradicate poverty and promote basic rights and justice. This includes the rights of the children and adults. The guiding principle of our Safeguarding Policy, here translated into French, is that Christian Aid believes that it is always unacceptable for children, young people, or adults to experience any kind of abuse.

Safeguarding policy, Spanish (PDF)

Christian Aid is committed to protecting the dignity and rights of every person, and works with those that are committed to supporting poor and marginalised communities to eradicate poverty and promote basic rights and justice. This includes the rights of the children and adults. The guiding principle of our Safeguarding Policy, here translated into Spanish, is that Christian Aid believes that it is always unacceptable for children, young people, or adults to experience any kind of abuse.

Christian Aid’s gender pay gap report 2017-2018

A report from our CEO, Amanda Khozi Mukwashi, on the gender pay gap at Christian Aid.

Tackling violence, building peace: global strategy 2016

Violence and conflict affects almost one fifth of the world’s population or 1.5 billion people. The daily fear, uncertainty and suffering borne by people living through violent conflicts in countries such as Syria, Iraq and South Sudan is immeasurable and unimaginable. The war in Syria, has contributed to the highest number of displaced people since World War II; nearly five million having fled its bombs and bullets. Meanwhile, the catastrophe continues for people trapped in besieged villages across Syria and Iraq. Other countries like Colombia are striving to end protracted conflicts and push peace over the line. Today, one in every 122 people is now a refugee, internally displaced or seeking asylum, and the cost of world military spending is said to be nearly 250 times more than is spent on peace building. Christian Aid has adopted ‘Tackling Violence, Building Peace,’ as a strategic priority to address these critical trends and because we know that human development cannot be achieved without tackling violence. Seventy years after Christian Aid’s establishment, the root causes and levels of violence in poor communities where we work persists, often at higher levels and irrespective of whether those communities are ‘at war’ or not. Most of the world’s poorest people live outside of any form of protection and remain vulnerable to war and conflict, violent criminal organisations, gender-based violence, police abuse, forced labour and violent theft of land and other assets on a daily basis. People who do not have a safe place to call home, reliable access to food and an income because of violence, cannot plan for the future. Communities living through daily violence cannot thrive. And children who are forced to leave school because of violence are denied a chance at their hopes and dreams. Women and girls are also increasingly subject to physical and sexual violence, a harrowing result of gender inequality. Conflict is complex and even when peace comes, it does not always signal an end to violence. It can mark a shift from militarised conflict to widespread social conflict. For example, in Central America more people die violently today due to crime than during the civil wars of Guatemala, El Salvador and Nicaragua combined. Our new strategy underpins our commitment to tackle violence and to promote just and lasting peace and security where we work. The strategy is deeply informed by our work in countries across the globe and reflects the aspirations and vision of our local partners. Peace is both an end in itself and a prerequisite for development. ‘Tackling Violence, Building Peace’ is our pledge to work tirelessly and collectively towards a safer future that secures justice and human rights for all.