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Gender, Inclusion, Power & Politics (GIPP) Toolkit - Part One - Guide

GIPP is an analysis tool developed by Christian Aid and Social Development Direct, through the ECID programme.

Gender, Inclusion, Power & Politics (GIPP) Toolkit - Part Two - Toolkit

GIPP is an analysis tool developed by Christian Aid and Social Development Direct, through the Evidence and Collaboration for Inclusive Development (ECID) programme, funded by UK Aid.

Christian Aid and United Nations World Food Programme Partnership

Christian Aid is working with the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) to fight extreme hunger in conflict-affected communities. Find out more about the programme and how your support can go even further thanks to a co-funding partnership with WFP.

Budget Credibility Report

This revenue and expenditure credibility analysis is designed to provide Sierra Leoneans, the Government of Sierra Leone (GoSL), development partners and other stakeholders with a full picture of revenue and expenditure in 2017, 2018 and 2019. Various Public Expenditure and Financial Accountability (PEFA) assessment reports (2010, 2014, and 2018) have highlighted the challenges in implementing a credible budget in Sierra Leone. The aim is to highlight performance against the budget at the total and sector level, to draw out some of the reasons behind this, and identify the impacts on public service delivery. The assessment will assist government in addressing some of the challenges that are adversely affecting budget credibility. It will also provide a basis for dialogue between civil society, Parliament, development partners and the GoSL regarding its public financial management reform strategy (2018 – 2021) and delivery of the National Development Plan.

June 2020, Sierra Leone Anti-Corruption Court Monitoring Report

To help strengthen the fight against corruption, an Anti-Corruption Division of the High Court has been established. Pursuant to a Constitutional Instrument dated 4th April 2019, the court is mandated to hear and determine all anti-corruption matters instituted by the Anti-Corruption Commission. The new division, which is expected to be a model court for criminal cases, was set up as part of efforts to address some of the traditional challenges that confront the criminal justice system. These include undue delays in proceedings, limited courtrooms, and integrity deficit among some administrative staff. As part of the efforts of the consortium to promote and strengthen the work of the Anti-Corruption Commission monitors the proceedings from this court and this report is the first from our monitoring of its proceedings. 

Corruption Perception Survey Report, 2019

This report – commissioned by the Centre for Accountability and Rule of Law (with funding from DFID and support from Christian Aid, Restless Development and Budget Advocacy Network) - seeks a bottom-up account from the Sierra Leonean people regarding the status of corruption. It examines their perceptions about the fight against corruption; about the institutions involved; about the delivery of public services, and about their own roles and actions in relation to the fight against corruption. The study was conducted between September and November 2019. Three data streams were utilized: a literature review; a social survey where 2619 persons were interviewed in all 16 districts of the country; followed by in-depth interviews geared towards getting detailed insights from experts and practitioners regarding their observations and reactions to the findings of the social survey 

Cost of Corruption in Sierra Leone Report, 2019

Corruption happens underground and its damage and volume can be difficult to quantify. This report systematically presents data on the quantitative estimate of the cost of corruption that occurred between 2016 - 2018 – the period leading up to the 2018 general elections in Sierra Leone onto the transfer of power to the opposition. The Centre for Accountability and the Rule of Law (CARL), along with its project consortium partners (Christian Aid, Restless Development and Budget Advocacy Network) commissioned this study to generate data which anti-corruption agencies and their partners could utilise to develop more effective tools to respond to and track progress in fighting corruption. Data was collected from ten sectors which form 72.5 percent of the economy. The sectors studied include agriculture, mining, energy, fishery, construction, banking, education, health, transport and communication

Tackling violence, building peace: global strategy 2016

Violence and conflict affects almost one fifth of the world’s population or 1.5 billion people. The daily fear, uncertainty and suffering borne by people living through violent conflicts in countries such as Syria, Iraq and South Sudan is immeasurable and unimaginable. The war in Syria, has contributed to the highest number of displaced people since World War II; nearly five million having fled its bombs and bullets. Meanwhile, the catastrophe continues for people trapped in besieged villages across Syria and Iraq. Other countries like Colombia are striving to end protracted conflicts and push peace over the line. Today, one in every 122 people is now a refugee, internally displaced or seeking asylum, and the cost of world military spending is said to be nearly 250 times more than is spent on peace building. Christian Aid has adopted ‘Tackling Violence, Building Peace,’ as a strategic priority to address these critical trends and because we know that human development cannot be achieved without tackling violence. Seventy years after Christian Aid’s establishment, the root causes and levels of violence in poor communities where we work persists, often at higher levels and irrespective of whether those communities are ‘at war’ or not. Most of the world’s poorest people live outside of any form of protection and remain vulnerable to war and conflict, violent criminal organisations, gender-based violence, police abuse, forced labour and violent theft of land and other assets on a daily basis. People who do not have a safe place to call home, reliable access to food and an income because of violence, cannot plan for the future. Communities living through daily violence cannot thrive. And children who are forced to leave school because of violence are denied a chance at their hopes and dreams. Women and girls are also increasingly subject to physical and sexual violence, a harrowing result of gender inequality. Conflict is complex and even when peace comes, it does not always signal an end to violence. It can mark a shift from militarised conflict to widespread social conflict. For example, in Central America more people die violently today due to crime than during the civil wars of Guatemala, El Salvador and Nicaragua combined. Our new strategy underpins our commitment to tackle violence and to promote just and lasting peace and security where we work. The strategy is deeply informed by our work in countries across the globe and reflects the aspirations and vision of our local partners. Peace is both an end in itself and a prerequisite for development. ‘Tackling Violence, Building Peace’ is our pledge to work tirelessly and collectively towards a safer future that secures justice and human rights for all.

Christian Aid Sierra Leone country strategy

Background to Christian Aid's work in Sierra Leone - our vision, aims, who we work with and what we do.