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Christian Aid expectations for COP25

Christian Aid's key asks for the COP25 climate conference in Madrid, Spain, December 2019. The past 18 months have seen a flurry of new scientific information on the state of the climate. Severe climate impacts are already being experienced, particularly by the poorest and most vulnerable. Communities and ecosystems are already suffering devastation even at the current 1ºC of warming. The fires in the Amazon, Congo and California, the South Asian floods, and other extreme weather events, like cyclones Idai and Fani, point to a climate system already in crisis. The world is in a state of climate emergency. The climate emergency is real and efforts to take action now must be a priority. We call on governments to make a step change in their climate ambition and in the support given to help developing countries achieve it. Key asks Mitigation All countries to recognise the scale of the climate challenge and the need for a fair global effort to achieve the Paris 1.5ºC goal. The Conference of Parties (COP) to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change should deliver a mandate for all countries to enhance the mitigation part of their Nationally-determined contributions (NDCs) in line with the 1.5ºC goal. The common time frame should be in five-year cycles. Long-term strategies should include landscape analyses to plan for nature-based solutions, to increase resilience, and to store and sequester carbon. Finance Adequate climate finance is a prerequisite to greater ambition in poor countries. Developed countries need to step up in providing adequate public finance to both help build resilience, but also to allow clean development and fulfillment – and exceedance - of the conditional parts of the NDCs. Loss and damage The Warsaw International Mechanism on Loss and Damage (WIM) should put greater focus on averting loss and damage than on post-event addressing of it. New, additional and adequate sources of climate finance are needed to enhance action. The potential of nature-based solutions for resilience should be given greater consideration and implementation priority. Adaptation Developing countries should be supported to complete and implement country-driven, gender-responsive, participatory and transparent adaptation plans. The overall financial flows, as well as the proportion of finance for adaptation need to be increased to allow vulnerable people, communities and ecosystems to adapt to the changing climate. Article 6 Rather than rely on ‘flexibility’ mechanisms, countries should instead focus on making transformational changes to their economies. Kyoto credits should play no role in any Paris mechanisms. Article 6 provisions should be adopted as a package. The Article 6 mechanisms should explicitly recognise the non-fungibility of fossil and biological carbon and prevent trade between them. Strong social and environmental safeguards are essential to be agreed before use of flexibility mechanisms. Nature-based solutions COP should recognise the potential co-benefits of nature-based solutions, as detailed in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) reports, and agree means to promote their implementation Nature-based solutions for mitigation should not be seen as an alternative to ending the use of fossil fuels. It should be seen as an additional and precautionary approach, with other co-benefits, including for resilience. Appropriate links with the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) and UN Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD)’s provisions should be made, and coherent implementation encouraged. Gender and Climate The revision must ensure that gender balance approaches are adopted under all the bodies of the convention. Download the full briefing here

World in disunion: Climate change and the Rugby World Cup

  The effects of climate change are being felt around the world and the Pacific islands are among the worst affected. But unless greenhouse gas emissions fall, the consequences in the coming decades will be far worse than anything seen so far. Fiji, Samoa and Tonga face an onslaught as the world warms. Hotter and more acidic oceans, due to higher levels of carbon dioxide, kill coral reefs upon which fish populations depend, while rising sea levels will swallow land, increase flooding and salinate water supplies. The region is also likely to experience more category 3 to 5 storms, such as last year’s Cyclone Gita which was the strongest tropical cyclone to hit Tonga since records began. Together these climate change impacts threaten to undermine the islands’ economies, deter tourists, making life increasingly tough and driving young people away, putting strain on the countries’ ability to field competitive rugby teams. Researchers warn of mass migration from the islands as a result of climate change in the coming decades. Alongside the Pacific island countries at the Rugby World Cup are some of the countries most responsible for the climate crisis. Major greenhouse gas polluters like the US, Australia, the hosts Japan, Russia, Canada, South Africa and the European nations will play at the tournament, to the tune of a world in union. But few, if any, of the most polluting competitors have credible plans to cut their emissions to safe levels - suggesting the World Cup’s theme song is just an empty promise. It is not too late to prevent dangerous climate change and to save the future for the Pacific islands, and the rest of the world. But it requires immediate action to cut emissions.

Keeping the SDGs on track

Detailing how the three basic SDG principles can be put into practice by improving accountability mechanisms under the High Level Political Forum .

Christian Aid Ethiopia newsletter July 2019

Latest updates from Christian Aid Ethiopia on our programmes, including promoting women's entrepreneurship in sustainable energy, meteorological services, drought recovery, veterinary services, education and water projects. Projects featured include the EU-funded Breaking the Barriers project and the DEC drought response.

Briefing: Time for climate justice

Why should we achieve net zero greenhouse emissions? How can we do that in a sensible, fair and sustainable way?  

COP24 briefing paper: progress on Paris in Katowice

COP24 represents a key milestone to help put the world on track to achieving the goals of the Paris Agreement. It needs to lead a process to deliver a balanced, comprehensive, robust and ambitious set of implementation guidelines.

Report: Achieving net zero greenhouse gas emissions in the UK

Why is 'net zero' important? This report outlines why the impacts of climate change are creating an urgent need for the UK to legislate for a net zero emissions target.

The Big Shift: Banks - campaign briefing

Get powered up for climate justice. Find out how banks are fuelling climate change, and how they could be a key part of the solution.

COP 23: Focus on the most vulnerable, focus on 'loss and damage'

A briefing outlining what Christian Aid are calling for at the United Nations climate change conference (COP23) in November 2017 in Bonn, Germany. What we're calling for at COP23 In 2013, world governments agreed to address the inevitable impacts of climate change that sufficient mitigation or adaptation have not prevented – otherwise known as ‘loss and damage’. Although this promise was reinforced in the 2015 Paris Agreement, they have yet to provide any international finance for this. Christian Aid and ACT Alliance are calling for COP23 to bring the reality of climate impacts into the heart of the climate negotiations and make progress on this crucial issue, to ensure vulnerable communities and countries have the resources to prevent, and respond to loss and damage from climate change.

ECRP Insights - May 2017

The regular bulletin of ECRP, Christian Aid Malawi's flagship resilience programme.

Time for climate justice 18: moving forward from Paris

Calls for Marrakesh conference to act springboard for accelerated climate action before 2020, while laying foundation for post-2020 climate regime.

Time for climate justice 16 - universal climate agreement

This briefing presents our vision for the Paris Agreement. We address the essential outcomes for a universal climate change agreement. We are calling for the world leaders to signal a turning point in the global approach to climate action and to outline clearly the next steps for strengthening the climate regime.  

Time for climate justice 15: climate resilient agriculture briefing

A combination of post-harvest losses, waste and over-consumption conspire to create 800 million malnourished people in developing countries.  

Time for climate justice 14 - climate justice for all

Putting gender justice at the heart of the Paris climate change agreement.

Time for climate justice 4 - Cancun climate talks

In November 2010, the world's governments will meet in the Mexican city of Cancun to continue negotiations on a global climate agreement.

Time for climate justice 9 - Doha climate talks - a better way forward

Lead up to the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Doha, November 2012  

Time for climate justice 7- sustainable energy for all

United Nations designates 2012 as Year of Access to Sustainable Energy for All and establishes panel to make recommendations on how to achieve this.