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Briefing paper: 'Sinking Cities, Rising Seas'

What this paper is about This paper looks at eight city case studies across Asia, Africa, the UK and the United States, including cities most vulnerable to climate change. It explores: some of the underlying reasons for those cities' vulnerability the additional impact that climate change will have on their people

Inequality and the state

This paper uses Christian Aid’s programme and policy experience to look at the relationship between inequality and development.

Can tax challenge bad governance? 

Argues that while there are no rules about what sort of tax system is best for governance, there are clear policy implications for donors and NGOs.

Measuring resilience impact at programme and project levels

A 'how to' guide on measuring the impact of resilience programming. This guide offers a wealth of information, from data collection considerations to communication and use of findings.

Taxing Ghana's informal sector: the experience of women

This paper looks at the situation of women working in the informal sector in Ghana and their experience of taxation.

Introducing Christian Aid Afghanistan

An introduction to Christian Aid’s programme in Afghanistan, which has been running for nearly three decades under four regimes – from the People’s Democratic Party of Afghanistan, which controlled the country during the Soviet invasion, to the current government that was voted in after the United States-led intervention of 2001. Today, our work in Afghanistan focuses on protecting human rights during conflicts, increasing food security, building the resilience of communities, and promoting the rights and empowerment of women. We work alongside local Afghan organisations on projects that reach and respond to the needs of communities facing high levels of poverty, disempowerment and inequality. Christian Aid works with its partners at every stage of a project – from needs assessment and design, to supporting partners and communities as they implement projects – and to regularly monitor and evaluate the impact and changes the work makes on the ground. All of our projects in Afghanistan are designed with our partners, and draw heavily on their relationships and lines of communication with communities. This approach means partners and communities understand the projects and are fully committed to them from the start. Since the majority of programme activities are implemented by the communities themselves, sustainability and a sense of local ownership are integral.