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Use and abuse of tax breaks: how tax incentives become harmful

Tax incentives widespread, but ineffective for developmet. How do they become harmful, and what can be done to stop their abuse?

Christian Aid Ethiopia Annual Report 2018/19

This report shows the impact of our work and testimonies that show how Christian Aid Ethiopia is supporting the most vulnerable communities in hard to reach parts of the country. It highlights out work on humanitarian response, DRR, strengthening climate services to farmers and pastoral communities, markets development and our work on promoting gender sensitive programming and support to communities to challenge power structures and systems that perpetuate gender violence. 

Christian Aid annual report and accounts 2018/19

Our Annual Report gives details of Christian Aid's objectives, key successes, challenges and accounts for 2018-19.

Press release: changing the course of under-five mortality in Nigeria

Our Partnership for Improved Child Health (PICH) project in Benue State, Nigeria, closed in August 2019. Read our press release to find out what we achieved and how communities have adapted. Every year, hundreds of thousands of children under the age of five years in Nigeria do not live up to their fifth birthday due to preventable childhood illnesses such as malaria, pneumonia, diarrhoea and severe acute malnutrition. Most under-five death occurs in remote, hard to reach communities where caregivers are faced with physical, social and financial barriers to access health services. Christian Aid , through this project, has empowered communities to take ownership of their own health by improving knowledge and health-seeking behaviour, giving hope in despair, and saving children under five who face imminent death due to barriers of access to and uptake of quality health services.  This project was funded by Christian Aid supporters and UK Aid Match from the UK government. 

Joint Country Programme newsletter - July - Sept 2018

A new country director, piped water comes to villages in Mumbeji, advocating for tax justice and more...

Christian Aid Annual Report 2017-18

Our Annual Report gives details of Christian Aid's objectives, key successes, challenges and accounts for 2017-18.

Humanitarian response to populations affected by violence in Konduga

A Christian Aid (CA) humanitarian response programme funded by the European Union’s Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid Operations has reached more than 40,000 people affected by the conflict in Konduga area, within Borno State. Food Security and Livelihoods (FSL) and Water Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) are the major response areas which has targeted the most vulnerable persons. ECHO has empowered Christian Aid to support access to food for the most vulnerable persons in Konduga through cash based interventions. The food security response targeted 18,000 people through a cash transfer intervention to help the vulnerable access food. Those reached through food assistance are spread across five communities within Konduga Local Government Area, in Borno State.

Questionable Values? Policy Report

Why we believe that it is time to stop defending the indefensible across all the world’s tax havens. Following the hurricanes Irma and Maria that devastated a number of Caribbean islands in September this year, the focus has rightly been on supporting the hardest hit and those in greatest need. But as the rebuilding effort develops, many are starting to think more deeply about the long-term sustainability of these islands’ economies, and their ability to protect and provide for their populations in an economically and climatically uncertain future. What type of jobs, and what type of economy, should places such as the British Virgin Islands (BVI) be looking to build? This is a question that extends beyond the storm-hit Caribbean. Defensive measures against tax evasion and avoidance are on the rise in the US, the EU and emerging economies, driven in part by the exposure of these activities in successive leaks of information (most recently, the Paradise Papers). Such developments call into question the sustainability of any economic model that relies on providing various combinations of secrecy and low taxation. So far, many small offshore centres, and their supporters, have largely reacted defensively to the threat of change, arguing that media coverage has unfairly maligned ‘tax havens’; that the problem is not as large as portrayed; and that they are already instituting tax and transparency standards better than many large ‘onshore’ economies. However, careful scrutiny of one of the most comprehensive efforts to explain the role of international finance centres and to illustrate the impact that such a territory has on the global economy – the prominent report that the government-backed financial lobby group, BVI Finance, commissioned this year from consultancy firm Capital Economics – demonstrates major weaknesses in the arguments and conclusions presented, and suggests to us that such defences are more concerned with maintaining the status quo than a genuine concern for the wider global economy. Our analysis of the Capital Economics report is an example of why we believe that it is time to stop defending the indefensible across all the world’s tax havens. With public demand building for new regulation, and the ever-present threat of further mass leaks, the UK Government needs to initiate a serious discussion about alternative economic pathways for the British Overseas Territories and Crown Dependencies. Alternative futures for offshore tax havens are not only vital for the poorest countries of the world that lose tax revenues each year to the offshore system, but also for the ordinary women and men in places like the BVI, for whom a secure future is dependent on the creation of robust, equitable and sustainable economies.

Out of the Frying Pan, Into the Fire (Part 2)

A debilitating drought may bring riots and social unrest in one country, but in a neighbouring country, the same problem may be dealt with by citizen mobilisation towards collective action solutions. To a large extent, governance capacity and community resilience explains the nature and structure of the response. In this report, three case studies – from Angola, Mali, and Honduras – of actual responses to climate change and conflict are presented.

Marsabit County Resilience Study

For several years Christian Aid has worked through partners to build the resilience of pastoralist communities in Marsabit County in northern Kenya. The fieldwork was carried out over two weeks in May 2017 to assess the value of investing in resilience work. 

Faith leaders and family planning report

A report into the major barriers and opportunities for faith leaders engaging with their communities on family planning.

Benefits? Tax Incentives in Latin America and the Caribbean (Spanish)

Overview of the use of tax incentives that analyses whether or not tax incentives bring benefits to countries and communities.(Spanish)

Annual report 2015-16

With your help, we reached millions of people in 2015/16, supporting them to improve their lives, to influence the actions of government and other power holders, and to meet the needs of those caught up in conflict and disasters.

Developing Climate services in the Phillipines: programme review

A review of the Rice Watch Action Network's Climate Resiliency Field School (CrFS) - a season-long training programme with a focus on sustainable farm training, including increased access to weather and climate forecasts.

Case study - partnership with Vitamins Angel Alliance (SCHH)

Through the Strengthening Community Health and HIV Response (SCHH) project, Christian Aid works in partnership with Vitamin Angels Alliance to provide Vitamin A supplements and deworming (VASD) to Nigerian children under the age of 5. A production of the Community Health and HIV (CHH) Team at Christian Aid.

Picture Power: Capturing stories of change through photography in Kenya

This report features incredible stories of changes and challenges that the communities captured in photos that they took in their communities as well as data gathered as part of the wider outcome assessment activities.