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Hunger Strike: The climate and food vulnerability index

The Climate and Food Vulnerability Index shows how the countries most impacted by food insecurity are the least responsible for the climate change which drives it.   The top 10 most insecure countries combined generate just 0.08% of global CO2 emissions. Burundi is both the most food insecure country in the world and has the smallest carbon footprint per person.

Generando Empresas y Derechos Humanos

Las prácticas corporativas irresponsables representan graves riesgos para los derechos humanos. A menudo, tienen impactos que afectan a las personas de manera diferente debido a su género, haciendo que las desigualdades que ya experimentan sean aún mayores. En este informe, identificamos estudios de casos, destacamos temas clave sobre el impacto de género de las prácticas corporativas y exploramos su relación con el derecho internacional de los derechos humanos y los marcos relacionados. Creemos que las empresas, en particular las empresas transnacionales, deben hacer valer los derechos humanos y deben ser responsabilizadas por el derecho internacional de los derechos humanos. También creemos que el Marco de Negocios y Derechos Humanos de la ONU, sus mecanismos de implementación, y los estados y entidades comerciales a los que se aplica, deben responder mejor a los impactos negativos de las empresas en los derechos de las mujeres y los géneros marginados.

Engendering Business and Human Rights

Irresponsible corporate practices pose serious human rights risks. Often, they have impacts which affect people differently because of their gender, making the inequalities that they already experience even greater. In this report, we identify case studies, highlight key issues on the gendered impact of corporate practices, and explore their relationship with international human rights law and related frameworks. We believe that businesses, in particular transnational corporations, must bring human rights to bear and must be held to account under international human rights law. We also believe that the UN Business and Human Rights Framework, its implementation mechanisms, and the states and business entities to which it applies, must respond better to the negative impacts of business on the rights of women and marginalised genders.

Christian Aid Ethiopia Annual Report 2017/18

Christian Aid has been working in Ethiopia for more than 30 years, initially responding to emergencies, but gradually building a long-term development programme. Our work has focused on food security, resilient livelihoods, health, accountable governance, economic justice, energy and climate change. Christian Aid Ethiopia has substantial experience and a strong reputation for working in remote locations, particular with vulnerable pastoral and agro-pastoral communities. Currently we operate in 39 districts in four regions – Oromia, Gambella, Benishangul-Gumuz, and Southern Nation, Nationalities and Peoples’ Region (SNNPR).

Virtuous Circle: scaling up investment in low carbon energy

This report demonstrates that the time for rapid deployment of renewable energy technologies is now. It shows that governments, policy makers and investors should realise that clean energy and clean energy investments are reliable, cost effective and scalable, and a solution for delivering clean and sustainable energy for all.

Maximising the benefits of the global phase-down of hydrofluorocarbons

This paper, published for the 30th Anniversary of the Montreal Protocol, discusses what is at stake in the implementation of the HFCs phase-down and related activities. It describes a suite of measures that, if taken together, will maximise the benefits of the phase-down of HFC refrigerants with high global warming potential, both in terms of the greenhouse gas emissions, and additional, sustainable development co-benefits. Summary The proliferation of household air conditioners and refrigerators across the world, including the rapid growth expected in developing countries, gives us an opportunity, right now, to ensure that the appliances we choose have minimum impact on the global climate and maximise sustainable development.  Last year’s hard-won Kigali Amendment to the Montreal Protocol ensured a commitment to remove HFC refrigerants with high global warming potential, through a global phase-down. Maximising the climate change and related benefits of this phase-down will depend on three elements coming together:  countries choosing refrigerants with the lowest global warming potentials  ensuring promotion of the most energy efficient cooling technologies  a rapid move to renewable energy to power these appliances. The right combination of these three elements will ensure that greenhouse gas emissions over the lifetime of each appliance are minimised.   Minimising greenhouse gas emissions Achieving each of these elements will require a range of actions, including addressing financing and cost issues, supporting capacity building and training, developing energy infrastructure plans and updating safety and energy efficiency standards. These diverse actions will need to be coordinated strategically, often across a number of distinct but critical venues, including the Montreal Protocol, the UNFCCC, various regional groups and domestic policy-making.  As we implement both the Montreal Protocol Kigali Amendment and the Paris Agreement, making the right coordinated and complementary decisions across these issues and venues will be essential to deliver a safe world with below 1.5C of global warming.

Adapta annual review 2016-17

Proyecto Adapta is a four-year project supported by Ingemann, a Nicaraguan company of Danish origin, and co-developed with the Nicaraguan non-governmental organisation Centro Humboldt and the international development agency Christian Aid.

Gender Analysis of Village Savings and Loans (ECRP)

Womens’ empowerment is a slow and incremental process, in which village and savings loan groups (VSL) can play a crucial role. In order to understand the impact of gender relations on VSL interventions, and vice-versa, focusing on the perceptions of men and women participating in VSL, household decision-making, and women’s access and control of VSL resources, Christian Aid commissioned a Gender and Power Analysis of VSL within ECRP. The study consists of a literature and document review, and primary qualitative research with 330 participants (191 women and 139 men) in 5 ECRP intervention districts; Kasungu, Mwanza, Mulanje, Nsanje, and Machinga. The analysis will progress by examining the influence of gender dynamics on VSL, and VSL on gender dynamics, relating to the woman herself, her household, the intervention, and the wider community.