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Pathways to Localisation: locally led humanitarian response (Nepali)

This Nepali-language paper presents a synthesis of the four national frameworks into one global localisation framework relevant for humanitarian practitioners, policy-makers and decision-makers. It outlines: The notable differences between the four national localisation frameworks, and reflect the diverse contexts specific to the very different operating environments and humanitarian crises in Myanmar, Nepal, Nigeria and South Sudan. A number of priority actions and areas common across the four frameworks, many of which link closely to existing localisation commitments, frameworks, and indicators which are referenced. The key areas included in all four national localisation frameworks, along with objectives, priority actions, and potential indicators.

Accelerating localisation - Nepali

Recommendations to strengthen leadership of actors in partnership-based humanitarian action in Nepal. (English language also available.)

Myanmar: Building a Culture of Dialogue manual - English

A facilitator’s manual to guide dialogue within and between communities in conflict. In Myanmar, violence and protracted conflict – often fuelled by fear, hatred and distrust – have a strong impact on people’s lives. Many years of peace building work make us believe in the importance of dialogue as a tool to build trust and strong relationships. Dialogue provides the opportunity to share feelings, understand different points of view and reflect on situations.   For our project ‘Sagar Wine’ (culture of dialogue) in Rakhine State, we developed a training manual. In three creative and interactive modules with many visuals, participants will explore personal development, understand the dynamics of conflict and practice dialogue facilitation skills. The manual ‘Building a Culture of Dialogue’ is available in English and Burmese language.

Myanmar: Building a culture of dialogue manual - Burmese

A facilitator’s manual to guide dialogue within and between communities in conflict. In Myanmar, violence and protracted conflict – often fuelled by fear, hatred and distrust – have a strong impact on people’s lives. Many years of peace building work make us believe in the importance of dialogue as a tool to build trust and strong relationships. Dialogue provides the opportunity to share feelings, understand different points of view and reflect on situations.   For our project ‘Sagar Wine’ (culture of dialogue) in Rakhine State, we developed a training manual. In three creative and interactive modules with many visuals, participants will explore personal development, understand the dynamics of conflict and practice dialogue facilitation skills. The manual ‘Building a Culture of Dialogue’ is available in English and Burmese language.

Accelerating localisation research summary - Nepal

Recommendations for operational practices that strengthen the leadership of national and local actors in partnership-based humanitarian action in Nepal.  Nepali version Who we are This research was commissioned by the Accelerating Localisation Through Partnerships programme – a multi-agency consortium programme funded by the European Commission’s Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid department (ECHO) over two years (2017-2019) – to establish what operational elements of partnerships between local, national and international NGOs are most likely to foster localisation of humanitarian action.  The research was underpinned by a mixed methods approach using qualitative and quantitative data collection approaches. In-depth consultations were conducted in three locations across Nepal to reach a varied sample of local and national actors: Kathmandu, Dhading and surrounding districts, and Dhanusa and surrounding districts. In total, 88 NGOs were consulted for this research in Nepal; 88% of which were local or national NGOs. The findings reflect experiences from a rich diversity of local and national NGOs in Nepal and provide valuable insights that can assist humanitarian organisations in ensuring partnership practices accelerate localisation of humanitarian action.

DEC Collective Learning Initiative

Nepal was shocked by a 7.8 magnitude earthquake on 25th of April 2015 and then after seventeen days another 7.3 magnitude rocked the country, exacerbating the humanitarian situation and reinforcing an already chaotic situation. This resulted in the death of approximately 9,000 individuals, impacting 8.1 million people by causing widespread displacement and destruction of homes, infrastructure and services. Numerous actors were involved in the response and recovery from local communities, national NGOs, the Nepal Army and Police, Government of Nepal, Red Cross and Red Crescent movement, foreign militaries, and international NGOs. To meet the devastation of the two earthquakes, there was a massive response; however, there were also challenges to reach the most vulnerable and those most in need.

LPRR final evaluation report

The Linking Preparedness, Response and Resilience (LPRR) project, which is part of the DFID funded Disasters Emergencies Preparedness Programme (DEPP), was carried out from 2015 to the end of March 2018. The project was delivered by a consortium led by Christian Aid, which included Action Aid, Concern, Help Age, King’s College London, Muslim Aid, Oxfam, Safer World, and World Vision. The LPRR project brings together the expertise of response and resilience professionals (and frameworks) in order to support communities affected by emergencies and at the risk of violence. The consortium was present through a research component in eight countries, namely Bangladesh, Democratic Republic of Congo, Philippines, Colombia, Indonesia, with pilot projects in Kenya, Pakistan and Myanmar. The project was delivered through three distinct strands: conflict prevention, humanitarian response, and learning.

LPRR knowledge co-development paper

Co-production is a process through which partners draw upon their own learning to feed into a collective knowledge creation process. It fits well within international development, humanitarian and resilience-building processes, where the multi-partner nature of many current projects ensures there is a multiplicity of perspectives that can be drawn upon. It can also be democratic – where all forms of knowledge are valued – and so create ownership; work to find a balance between theory and practice and strengthen (and build) technical capacity and process Co-production was explicitly employed in the Linking Preparedness, Resilience and Response (LPRR) project, part of the DFID funded Disasters and Emergencies, Preparedness Programme (DEPP). It explored how humanitarian response can be strengthened to enable (and not undermine) long term community resilience building. Christian Aid (CA) led the project with seven consortium partners – World Vision, Action Aid, Help Age International, Concern, Oxfam and Muslim Aid. The project collaborated with King's College London (KCL) who led the research function. The purpose of this practice paper is three-fold: To explore the learning environment amongst consortium partners i.e. group learning and the tools and processes employed to facilitate this To detail the challenges and enablers of an implementing NGOs, Christian Aid and other consortium partners, co-producing knowledge with an academic institute, KCL; and To assess how the project helped to build capacity amongst relevant agencies – including in-country partners.

LPRR: Empowering communities to lead humanitarian response

The DFID DEPP funded LPRR consortium is led by Christian Aid and includes Action Aid, Concern Worldwide, Help Age, King’s College London, Muslim Aid, Oxfam, Saferworld and World Vision. It aims to increase preparedness and resilience capacity in conflict and response settings. As part of the project, King’s College London University designed and implemented a study in Bangladesh, Colombia, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Indonesia, Kenya, Pakistan and the Philippines. It was one of the rare approaches which specifically asked 327 crises survivors and first responders from past humanitarian emergencies to draw upon their own experience and expertise to guide improved humanitarian response programming for long term resilience.

Disaster Risk Reduction in Christian Aid’s Rohingya Response

In May 2017, Cyclone Mora affected 355,000 in Cox’s Bazar. In the Rohingya camps, an estimated 70% shelters and 70-80% latrines were damaged. There are no cyclone shelters within the Rohingya camps and settlements, due to land constraints and government restrictions on permanent structures. With exceptions for the most vulnerable, there is no plan to evacuate the Rohingya camp population to cyclone shelters in the host community. Christian Aid's strategy involves: Community Risk Analysis (CRA) Risk mitigation Increase community resilience Pre-positioning of supplies

Rohingya Crisis response update, April 2018

Christian Aid and its partners have been supporting communities displaced by violence in Myanmar’s Rakhine State, and Rohingya refugees who have crossed the border into Bangladesh. This comprehensive update, from our dedicated team on the ground, provides the very latest information on our response so far, the challenges we have faced and our plans for the way forward, as well as stories of survival from refugees.

Nepal earthquake mid-term review

A mid-term review of Christian Aid's response to the Nepal earthquakes of 2015. Compiled by an independent assessor, this report includes key findings, recommendations, background and methodology. The management response and annexes can be found at the end of this document. This is an internal document, being shared for the benefit of others working on this response and to highlight key learnings and recommendations.  Summary The earthquakes of April and May 2015 had a devastating impact on the people of Nepal. According to the Nepal Government Ministry of Home Affairs, there were 8,891 fatalities, 22,302 injured, 604,930 homes destroyed, and a further 288,856 homes partially damaged. The national economy was affected with erosion of the asset base of the people; houses, farm produce, livestock, latrines, drinking water sources, irrigation canals, access roads, health/education facilities, etc. In this context, a multi-sectoral needs assessment (MSNA) was conducted by Christian Aid (CAID) in four heavily damaged districts (Gorkha, Dhading, Dolakha and Sindhupalchowk) immediately after the earthquake. The MSNA followed the United Nations for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) guidelines and identified five priority sectors requiring the most support: Shelter Livelihood and Food security, Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) Education Gender Equality and Social Inclusion CAID responded to the aftermath of the earthquake through relief and recovery. The relief phase focused on providing immediate life-saving support; temporary shelters, safe drinking water, hygiene kits, temporary latrines, food basket for one-month period, and targeted trainings such as masonry and carpenters. In the recovery phase, CAID continued support to all four major sectors with the aim of strengthening the resilience of communities and institutions from the impact of natural disasters. Activities included housing support, prototype housing, winterisation kits, toilet support, school shelter, community and school water rehabilitation, cash grants, livelihood support such as goat, seeds, and rain water harvesting distribution were conducted. Method The evaluation used a range of qualitative and quantitative methods for data collection. Qualitative data was collected through focus group discussions (FGDs), key informant interviews (KIIs), in-depth interviews (IDI), case stories and observations of communities. Qualitative data collection questions were categorised by sector, and in line with the CHS commitments. Quantitative data was collected and analysed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS). The analysis was mostly descriptive in nature, with percentages, mean and frequencies. Download the report above to read the full analysis and findings.

Accountability Assessment Rohingya Response Bangladesh

This report provides data and analysis to inform the humanitarian sector on the implementation of accountability systems for the Rohingya camps in the Cox’s Bazar area, Bangladesh. Based on a knowledge, attitudes and practice (KAP) survey of 373 people (194 women and 179 men), and a review of accountability pilot projects, the analysis highlights the ineffectiveness of current accountability systems, and explores alternatives that could improve the overall accountability ecosystem. If the humanitarian sector is serious about accountability, then we need to promptly and comprehensively address the issues arising in this report and tailor accountability systems towards Rohingya preferences and practices.

Conflict prevention strand of the LPRR

The Linking Preparedness, Resilience and Response project (LPRR) was a consortium initiative, running from 2015 to 2018, funded by DFID through Disasters and Emergencies Preparedness Programme (DEPP). It was implemented by the START Network, under the management of Christian Aid. The project developed an ‘Integrated Conflict Prevention and Resilience’ (ICPR), methodology drawing on best practice of conflict sensitivity and resilience strengthening. The methodology was tested in ten communities across two contexts; Northern Kenya and North-West Pakistan. The aim of this paper is to describe the process of implementing these pilots and to gather learning about what worked well and what did not, in order to inform the design and implementation of future humanitarian and development initiatives in conflict-affected contexts.

Shifting the Power Bangladesh: humanitarian capacity building

Shifting the Power aims to create a balanced humanitarian system and move towards locally owned and led responses. This outlines the agenda, aims and voices from Bangladesh.

The Climate Challenge

Case study on community adaptation and women's empowerment in Bangladesh.