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Disaster Risk Reduction in Christian Aid’s Rohingya Response

In May 2017, Cyclone Mora affected 355,000 in Cox’s Bazar. In the Rohingya camps, an estimated 70% shelters and 70-80% latrines were damaged. There are no cyclone shelters within the Rohingya camps and settlements, due to land constraints and government restrictions on permanent structures. With exceptions for the most vulnerable, there is no plan to evacuate the Rohingya camp population to cyclone shelters in the host community. Christian Aid's strategy involves: Community Risk Analysis (CRA) Risk mitigation Increase community resilience Pre-positioning of supplies

Out of the Frying Pan, Into the Fire (Part 2)

A debilitating drought may bring riots and social unrest in one country, but in a neighbouring country, the same problem may be dealt with by citizen mobilisation towards collective action solutions. To a large extent, governance capacity and community resilience explains the nature and structure of the response. In this report, three case studies – from Angola, Mali, and Honduras – of actual responses to climate change and conflict are presented.

The Climate Challenge

Case study on community adaptation and women's empowerment in Bangladesh.

LPRR: action learning research

In order for productive learning to occur within the context of this project, monitoring practices must be robust and go beyond collecting data against indicators. This is especially important within a resilience context, as the pre-emptive baseline measurement that is usually used for measuring progress/success is not desirable here. Instead, an ‘outcome harvesting’ approach is more practical, as it does not measure progress towards predetermined outcomes or objectives, but rather collects evidence of what has been achieved, and works backward to determine whether and how the project or intervention contributed to the change. Within the LPRR project there is a need for rigorous evaluation, which balances accountability and learning. Given the ever-evolving evidence base of ‘what works under what conditions’ coupled with the need to demonstrate quality, impactful programming in both upwards and downwards accountability, these types of robust evaluations are essential. In order to ensure learning and accountability are achieved through evaluations, they must be well-planned and budgeted for. This is where the role of the learning strand comes in; by recognising that learning is essential at the outset, it enables it to be included within the design of the project.

Low-carbon development in South Asia: leapfrogging to a green future

The report gives examples of the potential for low-carbon energy in Bangladesh, India, Nepal and Pakistan.