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Song of the prophets

A global theology of climate change

Evidence Report: Project Maria Caicedo

Development of inclusive markets to build peace in Colombia. The case of the Peasant Reserve Zones of the Cimitarra River Valley, Catatumbo and Tulua.

Informe de evidencia: Proyecto María Caicedo

Desarrollo de mercados inclusivos para construir paz en Colombia. El caso de las Zonas de Reserva Campesina del Valle del Río Cimitarra, Catatumbo y Tuluá

Desarollo de mercados inclusivos para construir paz en Colombia

Colombia es el mayor productor de hoja de coca del mundo. Desde el 2000, Estados Unidos ha asignado 10.000 millones de dólares en un intento por detener su producción, y se han fumigado más de 1,6 millones de hectáreas en un intento por erradicar las plantaciones de coca. Sin embargo, la superficie cultivada en el país ha aumentado en un promedio de 45% por año - con 177.000 hectáreas en 2017 que se utilizan para el cultivo de coca. Como es evidente, la lucha contra las drogas ha fracasado. Trabajando en las Zonas de Reserva Campesina del Valle del Río Cimitarra, Catatumbo y Tuluá, el Proyecto María Caicedo trabaja para la transformación de las economías de guerra en economías de paz. El proyecto se diseñó para captar la voz de los que quedaron atrás (a través de los años de conflicto en Colombia, y por los esfuerzos subsiguientes para traer la paz) y se involucraron en las economías ilegales en la Colombia rural. Esta investigación proporcionó elementos clave para contribuir a la construcción de paz en Colombia a través de la transformación de las economías de guerra en economías de paz en las Zonas de Reserva Campesina (ZRC). Adoptamos un enfoque sistémico, que involucra los sistemas políticos y económicos a nivel local y nacional, buscando dar a las personas más marginadas una voz y, en última instancia, poder para salir de la pobreza. Estos informes, tanto en inglés como en español, muestran los resultados de nuestra investigación y cómo Colombia puede avanzar hacia economías de paz. Este reporte muestra un resumen de los resultados del Proyecto. Para leer el reporte completo, haga clic aquí. 

Development of Inclusive Markets to Build Peace in Colombia

Colombia is the largest producer of coca leaf in the world. Since 2000, United States has allocated USD 10 billion in an attempt to stop its production, with more than 1.6 million hectares being sprayed in an attempt to eradicate coca plantations. But the cultivated area in the country has increased by an average of 45% per year – with 177,000 hectares in 2017 being used for growing coca. As is evident, the fight against drugs has failed. Working in the Peasant Reserve Zones of the Cimitarra River Valley, Catatumbo and Tuluá, Project Maria Caicedo works towards the transformation of war economies into peace economies. The project was designed to capture the voice of those left behind (through the years of conflict in Colombia, and by the subsequent efforts to bring peace) and involved in illegal economies in the rural Colombia. This research provided key building blocks in the foundation of peace in Colombia through the transformation of war economies to peace economies in Peasant Reserve Areas (ZRC, by its acronym in Spanish). We  took a systemic approach, which involved the political and economic systems at the local and national levels, seeking to give the most marginalised people a voice and ultimately power to emerge from poverty. This report gives a summary of the project's findings. For the full report, click here.

Christian Aid’s gender pay gap report 2019-2020

A 2-page report from our Chief Executive, Amanda Khozi Mukwashi. The report covers: A comparison of both the mean (average) and median (mid-point) in the hourly rate we paid to men and women on 5 April 2019 How our gender pay gap is driven, according to our analysis How our gender pay gap compares to organisations across the UK and within our sector What we're doing to address the gender pay gap at Christian Aid

Pathways to Localisation: locally led humanitarian response (English)

This paper presents a synthesis of the four national frameworks into one global localisation framework relevant for humanitarian practitioners, policy-makers and decision-makers. It outlines: The notable differences between the four national localisation frameworks, and reflect the diverse contexts specific to the very different operating environments and humanitarian crises in Myanmar, Nepal, Nigeria and South Sudan. A number of priority actions and areas common across the four frameworks, many of which link closely to existing localisation commitments, frameworks, and indicators which are referenced. The key areas included in all four national localisation frameworks, along with objectives, priority actions, and potential indicators.

Pathways to Localisation: locally led humanitarian response (Arabic)

This Arabic-language paper presents a synthesis of the four national frameworks into one global localisation framework relevant for humanitarian practitioners, policy-makers and decision-makers. It outlines: The notable differences between the four national localisation frameworks, and reflect the diverse contexts specific to the very different operating environments and humanitarian crises in Myanmar, Nepal, Nigeria and South Sudan. A number of priority actions and areas common across the four frameworks, many of which link closely to existing localisation commitments, frameworks, and indicators which are referenced. The key areas included in all four national localisation frameworks, along with objectives, priority actions, and potential indicators.

Pathways to Localisation: locally led humanitarian response (Nepali)

This Nepali-language paper presents a synthesis of the four national frameworks into one global localisation framework relevant for humanitarian practitioners, policy-makers and decision-makers. It outlines: The notable differences between the four national localisation frameworks, and reflect the diverse contexts specific to the very different operating environments and humanitarian crises in Myanmar, Nepal, Nigeria and South Sudan. A number of priority actions and areas common across the four frameworks, many of which link closely to existing localisation commitments, frameworks, and indicators which are referenced. The key areas included in all four national localisation frameworks, along with objectives, priority actions, and potential indicators.

Partnerships for humanitarian action: challenges for large INGOs

Read the notes from the January 2020 roundtable held to discuss the challenges for large INGOs without a traditional partnership approach. This paper contains: Notes from the roundtable, co-hosted by the Accelerating Localisation through Partnerships programme and the Humanitarian Policy Group (HPG) of ODI, in January 2020. The roundtable aimed to discuss the challenges for large international NGOs, without a traditional partnership approach, moving towards partnerships in humanitarian contexts in pursuit of localisation.

Illicit drugs and tough trade-offs in war-to-peace transitions

Millions of marginalised people rely on illicit drug economies - often deeply intertwined with armed conflicts - for their survival. But Agenda 2030, particularly Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 16, makes no mention of illicit drug economies. It is clear that the war on drugs has not worked, and it is increasingly recognised that a new, development-based approach to tackling illicit economies is needed. But at present, the evidence base to inform such policies is weak. This report presents evidence on why illicit drugs are a development issue and why they matter for peacebuilding, before discussing the problem with current approaches, and the implications for drugs, peacebuilding and development policy. Report authors: Ross Eventon and Eric Gutierrez

Use and abuse of tax breaks: how tax incentives become harmful

Taxation is essential to raise sufficient, equitable and accountable financing for development. Only through taxation can governments fund public spending on the essential services at the quality and scale necessary to realise the rights of all citizens. Yet many Southern governments decide not to tax certain corporations and companies in the hope that this will attract cross-border investment. Despite mounting evidence that the practice of offering tax incentives is both largely ineffective and detrimental to development, it is widespread. This report explains how tax incentives can become harmful, and discusses what can be done to stop their abuse.

Developing skills for life and making connections in Ghana

In this final update from our EU funded GEOP programme in Ghana, we discover how young men and women are gaining technical, business and leadership skills and are using their collective voice to create better working environments. 

Modern Slavery Act

To tackle the root causes of modern slavery is to tackle the root causes of economic and social inequality. This Modern Slavery Statement outlines our continued work in our own supply chains. We have reviewed progress from our previous statement in 2018-19, and set new targets and commitments for 2019-20 onwards You can also read our previous modern slavery statement

Pathways to Localisation: locally-led humanitarian action (English)

This paper outlines eight priority actions for partnership-based humanitarian action, and five actions for an enabling environment, for locally-led humanitarian action.  It is informed by more than 400 humanitarian agencies – the majority of them local and national organisations – through research, piloting and the development of National Localisation Frameworks, in Myanmar, Nepal, Nigeria and South Sudan.  It outlines priority actions and a range of indicators under the areas of partnerships, capacity, financial resources, and coordination.  This paper outlines eight priority actions for partnership-based humanitarian action, and five actions for an enabling environment, for locally-led humanitarian action. It is available in English, French, Spanish, Arabic, Myanmar and Nepali, from the Accelerating Localisation through Partnerships project page. Who is it for? This paper is relevant for all those implementing and funding humanitarian response. It was developed as part of the Accelerating Localisation through Partnerships project implemented by Christian Aid, CARE, Tearfund, ActionAid, CAFOD and Oxfam, guided by national steering committees, and funded by the European Commission’s Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid Operations (ECHO) over 2017-2019.

Christian Aid Ethiopia Annual Report 2018/19

This report shows the impact of our work and testimonies that show how Christian Aid Ethiopia is supporting the most vulnerable communities in hard to reach parts of the country. It highlights out work on humanitarian response, DRR, strengthening climate services to farmers and pastoral communities, markets development and our work on promoting gender sensitive programming and support to communities to challenge power structures and systems that perpetuate gender violence. 

Christian Aid annual report and accounts 2018/19

Our Annual Report gives details of Christian Aid's objectives, key successes, challenges and accounts for 2018-19.

Vers la localisation (Pathways to localisation - French)

Cadre visant à une intervention humanitaire menée à l’échelle locale et fondée sur le partenariat. This paper outlines eight priority actions for partnership-based humanitarian action, and five actions for an enabling environment, for locally-led humanitarian action. It is available in English, French, Spanish, Arabic, Myanmar and Nepali, from the Accelerating Localisation through Partnerships project page. Note de synthèse  Le Sommet Humanitaire Mondial (WHS) de 2016 a souligné le rôle primordial des acteurs locaux et nationaux dans l’intervention humanitaire. Les trois grandes séries d’engagements qui y ont été prises, à savoir le Programme d’Action pour l’Humanité (2016), le Grand Compromis (2016) et la Charte pour le Changement (2015), ont énoncé les changements ou les transformations nécessaires pour permettre aux acteurs locaux et nationaux de prendre davantage les rênes de l’action humanitaire.   À l’initiative du consortium formé de Christian Aid, CARE, Tearfund, ActionAid, CAFOD et Oxfam, Accelerating Localisation through Partnerships est un programme orienté par les acteurs locaux et nationaux qui siègent dans des comités nationaux de pilotage. La Protection Civile et Opérations d’Aide de la Commission Européenne (ECHO) l’a financé de la fin 2017 à 2019. Ce programme s’inspire de travaux du consortium qui depuis 2012, par le biais de la série de rapports Missed Opportunities, visent à renforcer le rôle moteur des acteurs locaux et nationaux dans l’action humanitaire.   À l’issue de ses recherches, le programme Accelerating Localisation through Partnerships a mis en évidence un modèle fondé sur les pratiques de partenariat qui, selon les acteurs locaux/nationaux, favorisent le plus la localisation4. Pour les besoins de ces travaux, plus de 350 organisations au Myanmar, au Népal, au Nigeria et au Soudan du Sud, dont 85 % sont des organisations locales et nationales, ont été consultées. Elles ont permis aux membres du consortium et à leurs partenaires locaux de repérer, de valider et d’expérimenter un certain nombre de recommandations. Les leçons tirées de la phase d’expérimentation ont été regroupées avec les conclusions des auto-évaluations des capacités de plus d’une centaine d’acteurs locaux et nationaux. Les recherches, les leçons et les conclusions du programme ont façonné l’élaboration de cadres nationaux de localisation. Les acteurs locaux et nationaux, et d’autres intervenants humanitaires, y compris des ONG internationales, des agences des Nations Unies, des donateurs, les sociétés de la Croix-Rouge et du Croissant-Rouge, et les autorités gouvernementales concernées y ont également contribué.   Les quatre cadres nationaux de localisation sont adaptés au contexte très différencié des environnements opérationnels et des crises humanitaires au Myanmar, au Népal, au Nigeria et au Soudan du Sud. Les écarts notables entre les quatre cadres nationaux de localisation sont présentés dans ce document et reflètent la diversité des contextes. Les différences tiennent particulièrement au rôle des autorités gouvernementales dans la localisation. Cependant, ces quatre cadres ont en commun un certain nombre d’actions et de domaines prioritaires, dont plusieurs sont étroitement liés aux engagements, aux cadres et aux indicateurs de localisation existants et cités en référence. Alors que le programme Accelerating Localisation through Partnerships était axé sur l’action humanitaire fondée sur le partenariat, les cadres nationaux de localisation sont allés bien au-delà. Ce rapport présente les principaux domaines traités dans les quatre cadres nationaux de localisation, ainsi que leurs objectifs, leurs actions prioritaires et leurs indicateurs potentiels.  Note d’orientation sur les pratiques de partenariat en vue de la localisation.