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Gilead Sciences

Gilead Sciences partnered for better health in Nigeria

Christian Aid Nigeria’s Covid-19 response actions

Tackling the infodemic of COVID-19 The nature of the Covid19 pandemic has brought on an infodemic that needs to be tackled as urgently and seriously as the clinical symptoms of the disease itself. In the light of this, it is critical that the public is informed by credible experts, however, in some of the states where we work, awareness creation on the virus has been pre-dominantly urban-based, thereby leaving out those in rural areas with limited access to information channels. This has presented a huge opportunity for misinformation, myths and misconceptions to drive people’s actions and reactions such as the refusal or unwillingness of some citizens to comply to the standard preventive procedures. Information equity is therefore very crucial at this point along with the promotion of health-enhancing behaviours such as proper handwashing. Given this and our niche of reaching the unreached; especially the most vulnerable and those in the most hard-to-reach areas, Christian Aid in Nigeria is bridging the information gap by targeting those with limited access to information, either because of barriers such as language or lack access to information sources or those with little or no contact with the government or other external bodies. We have adapted and continue to disseminate official COVID-19 messaging on prevention, symptoms, transmission and key facts about the virus to bridge the language and access barrier that has been identified, creating awareness and improving the knowledge of the target population on prevention measures. Produced in a variety of formats suitable for different groups such as non-English speakers (7 local languages) and non-literates, we are also targeting the elderly, pregnant women, children, people living with disability, traditional rulers, Faith groups and actors. They include audio-visuals, animations, print materials (posters and handbills) and radio jingles for varying information channels. Given the nature of the communities, efforts are concentrated on using radio, church and mosque public address systems to provide accurate information in accessible ways. Working with INERELA+ Nigeria through its state chapters and networks, we are also leveraging on the huge influence of faith leaders by facilitating the use of theological teaching on radio to guide congregation response on covid-19 and address myths and misconceptions.   Existing community platforms and networks such as Community Disaster Management and Mitigation Platform (CDMMP), Disaster Management and Mitigation Platform (DMMP), media agencies, Community Based Monitors (CBMS), partner organizations, Town Unions and COMEN have also been used for information dissemination. These already established community structures have gained the trust of their communities over the years and are key influencers in promoting new behaviours such as physical distancing and frequent handwashing.  Christian Aid and partners have also leveraged on activities such as food distribution and others to sensitise and integrate messaging. Capacity building and Social Mobilisation Through the difficult times brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic, Christian Aid Nigeria is supporting vulnerable households to stay safe and maintain/increase their source of livelihood.  This has been done through the strengthening of communities’ capacity for covid-19 preparedness and response in Benue State. 75 community front liners constituting of social mobilizers, Community Spokespeople, Faith Leaders, Primary Health Care contacts amongst others were selected and trained for preparedness and response actions. The preparedness training was extended to build the resilience capacity of 100 caregivers and 100 household heads by training them to produce home-made handwashing liquid soaps and sanitizers as a strategy to cushion economic hardship of the lockdown policy and to promote hygiene practices within the households. Internally Displaced People (IDP) and members of host communities in Maiduguri, Jere and Dikwa were also trained to produce soap and face masks as a livelihood boosting activity.   Adapting emergency interventions In Northeast Nigeria thousands of households still suffer from food shortage and depend on supplies from development agencies. While we continue to deliver life-saving food assistance to IDPs across different camps in Borno State, we are fully committed to the safety of those we serve even in this difficult time and in the changing context.   This is demonstrated by key mitigation strategies that have been employed. One of such is the introduction of double rationing since April. This strategy ensures that distribution exercises are reduced from a 1-month to a 2-month basis as it provides beneficiaries with food for 2 months. In addition to the adherence to social distancing during community engagements and distributions and the provision of PPE for staff and volunteers, hand washing stations have been established at distribution sites.    Long term commitments Christian Aid remains committed to ensuring that marginalised and vulnerable populations can survive the secondary impacts of the pandemic with dignity and that it does not erode the huge strides made towards drawing people out of poverty. Actions with more long-term effects have therefore include data collection and analysis of the effect of covid-19 on the livelihood of marginalised groups to influence decision-making. This was done in Anambra and Kaduna States through the Evidence and Collaboration for Inclusive Development. The C19 NALPER project also provided the opportunity for facility and household assessments, providing key data for covid-19 interventions in Borno, Benue and Kaduna States. 

Simmons and Simmons

Simmons and Simmons partnering for a fairer and more just world

Evidence Report: Project Maria Caicedo

Development of inclusive markets to build peace in Colombia. The case of the Peasant Reserve Zones of the Cimitarra River Valley, Catatumbo and Tulua.

Informe de evidencia: Proyecto María Caicedo

Desarrollo de mercados inclusivos para construir paz en Colombia. El caso de las Zonas de Reserva Campesina del Valle del Río Cimitarra, Catatumbo y Tuluá

Desarollo de mercados inclusivos para construir paz en Colombia

Colombia es el mayor productor de hoja de coca del mundo. Desde el 2000, Estados Unidos ha asignado 10.000 millones de dólares en un intento por detener su producción, y se han fumigado más de 1,6 millones de hectáreas en un intento por erradicar las plantaciones de coca. Sin embargo, la superficie cultivada en el país ha aumentado en un promedio de 45% por año - con 177.000 hectáreas en 2017 que se utilizan para el cultivo de coca. Como es evidente, la lucha contra las drogas ha fracasado. Trabajando en las Zonas de Reserva Campesina del Valle del Río Cimitarra, Catatumbo y Tuluá, el Proyecto María Caicedo trabaja para la transformación de las economías de guerra en economías de paz. El proyecto se diseñó para captar la voz de los que quedaron atrás (a través de los años de conflicto en Colombia, y por los esfuerzos subsiguientes para traer la paz) y se involucraron en las economías ilegales en la Colombia rural. Esta investigación proporcionó elementos clave para contribuir a la construcción de paz en Colombia a través de la transformación de las economías de guerra en economías de paz en las Zonas de Reserva Campesina (ZRC). Adoptamos un enfoque sistémico, que involucra los sistemas políticos y económicos a nivel local y nacional, buscando dar a las personas más marginadas una voz y, en última instancia, poder para salir de la pobreza. Estos informes, tanto en inglés como en español, muestran los resultados de nuestra investigación y cómo Colombia puede avanzar hacia economías de paz. Este reporte muestra un resumen de los resultados del Proyecto. Para leer el reporte completo, haga clic aquí. 

Development of Inclusive Markets to Build Peace in Colombia

Colombia is the largest producer of coca leaf in the world. Since 2000, United States has allocated USD 10 billion in an attempt to stop its production, with more than 1.6 million hectares being sprayed in an attempt to eradicate coca plantations. But the cultivated area in the country has increased by an average of 45% per year – with 177,000 hectares in 2017 being used for growing coca. As is evident, the fight against drugs has failed. Working in the Peasant Reserve Zones of the Cimitarra River Valley, Catatumbo and Tuluá, Project Maria Caicedo works towards the transformation of war economies into peace economies. The project was designed to capture the voice of those left behind (through the years of conflict in Colombia, and by the subsequent efforts to bring peace) and involved in illegal economies in the rural Colombia. This research provided key building blocks in the foundation of peace in Colombia through the transformation of war economies to peace economies in Peasant Reserve Areas (ZRC, by its acronym in Spanish). We  took a systemic approach, which involved the political and economic systems at the local and national levels, seeking to give the most marginalised people a voice and ultimately power to emerge from poverty. This report gives a summary of the project's findings. For the full report, click here.

Understanding change and peacebuilding in a Colombian human rights NGO

REL Practice Paper 2 This paper looks at the Theory of Change of the Inter-Church Justice and Peace Commission (CIJP), a human rights NGO and long-term partner of Christian Aid Colombia. It offers a window into understanding how an organisation set up to respond to a violent conflict perceives change in its own role as the conflict itself changes.  The paper traces shifts in CIJP’s relationship with the state, with communities, with its allies in civil society and with the private sector, and the strategies and interventions it now uses to work towards mobilised communities, an operational rule of law, and a democracy based on justice and peace. As well as documenting its current ToC, the paper proposes to Christian Aid and CIJP an approach that could be used to track future shifts to build up a detailed, long-term picture of the strategic evolution of a CSO in a shifting political context.   Author: Rosemary McGee

Balancing research and practice in an international NGO

REL Practice Paper 1 Ten Years of Change is a collaborative, long-term practitioner research initiative designed to take place in three countries – Colombia, Kenya and the UK. It is implemented by the Research, Evidence and Learning team at Christian Aid. The research began with the overarching question how are community members and supporters being influenced by, and influencing, processes of social change? Each country team adapted the question to make it relevant to their socio-political context, and designed research at several different levels, from local to national. This paper tells the story of the first three years of Ten Years of Change. It narrates our ideas and ambitions and how we clarified them; how we identified where, by whom and how the study would be implemented; and how we worked with colleagues in other countries to begin to translate our idea into practice. It then discusses the forces that shaped the parallel but distinct evolution of each of the three streams of the study, before reflecting on the challenges of trade-offs and power. It concludes by returning to some of our assumptions about practitioner research, reflecting on how they played out in practice, finally turning to considerations for the next stage of the study.  

Illicit drugs and tough trade-offs in war-to-peace transitions

Millions of marginalised people rely on illicit drug economies - often deeply intertwined with armed conflicts - for their survival. But Agenda 2030, particularly Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 16, makes no mention of illicit drug economies. It is clear that the war on drugs has not worked, and it is increasingly recognised that a new, development-based approach to tackling illicit economies is needed. But at present, the evidence base to inform such policies is weak. This report presents evidence on why illicit drugs are a development issue and why they matter for peacebuilding, before discussing the problem with current approaches, and the implications for drugs, peacebuilding and development policy. Report authors: Ross Eventon and Eric Gutierrez

Giving Hope to People in Conflict

Christian Aid Blanket Supplementary Feeding Program (BSFP) project provided immediate life-saving food and nutrition assistance to breast-feeding and children under the age of five years.

Christian Aid Nigeria programme strategy: 2019-2026

An overview of the vision, mission and strategy of the Christian Aid Nigeria programme for 2019-2026. For the next seven years, we will continue Standing Together with the most marginalised and vulnerable people to ensure everyone has the opportunity to live a full life and poverty is eradicated. Our essential purpose as an organisation is to see an end to poverty, and Christian Aid Nigeria is committed to seeing this become a reality. This new strategy will guide our activities and help us tackle the power imbalance that perpetuates poverty in Nigeria.

Press release: changing the course of under-five mortality in Nigeria

Our Partnership for Improved Child Health (PICH) project in Benue State, Nigeria, closed in August 2019. Read our press release to find out what we achieved and how communities have adapted. Every year, hundreds of thousands of children under the age of five years in Nigeria do not live up to their fifth birthday due to preventable childhood illnesses such as malaria, pneumonia, diarrhoea and severe acute malnutrition. Most under-five death occurs in remote, hard to reach communities where caregivers are faced with physical, social and financial barriers to access health services. Christian Aid , through this project, has empowered communities to take ownership of their own health by improving knowledge and health-seeking behaviour, giving hope in despair, and saving children under five who face imminent death due to barriers of access to and uptake of quality health services.  This project was funded by Christian Aid supporters and UK Aid Match from the UK government. 

Life-saving healthcare for Nigeria's children - UK Aid Match stories

Since September 2016, Christian Aid Nigeria has been working in four Local Government Areas, Kwande, Konshisha, Obi and Opokwu, in Benue State, Nigeria, to reduce child mortality and morbidity rates. Through our local partners Jireh Doo Foundation and Ohonyeta Care Givers, we have reached more than 300,000 children with lifesaving support from malaria, pneumonia and diarrhoea through Christian Aid trained community health volunteers. The UK Aid match funded project has trained 996 community health volunteers to provide lifesaving treatment in the community, rather than relying on health centres that can be hard to reach, and care givers may not have the necessary funds to afford treatment. The programme also works through supporting and training Community Development Committee members to work with their communities to identify challenges and opportunities, and to create and deliver action plans to overcome obstacles to accessing healthcare.

Baseline Survey of Early Warning and Early Response Systems

This report is a baseline survey on the early warning and early response systems in Benue, Kaduna and Plateau States. It explains the capacity and resources available and how the project can support and strengthen the different state structures to be better responsive to any disaster especially flooding.

Keeping hope alive: Christian Aid's work on peace - Impact study 2019

Without an explicit focus on peace, there can be no sustainable development. This Impact Study, and accompanying case studies, share some of our story of taking peace seriously. Throughout our work in providing humanitarian assistance and long-term development support, it has become clear that we cannot ignore the reality of violence. Peace and justice matter to us as a faith-based organisation and we seek to respond to real challenges of building peace with integrity, respect, courage and hope. From Violence to Peace lays down our hopeful vision that a more peaceful reality free from poverty, violence and injustice is possible. This study shares key examples of impact and some things we’ve learnt along the way. Key facts In 2016, more countries experienced violent conflict than at any time in nearly 30 years. If current trends persist, by 2030 – the horizon set by the Sustainable Development Goals – more than half of the world’s poor will be living in countries affected by high levels of violence. (OECD). Violent conflict has spiked since 2010, with two billion people now living in countries where development outcomes are affected by fragility, conflict, and violence (World Bank, 2018). Much of this violence is due to recurring violence and protracted conflicts. It is estimated that 135 different countries have experienced conflict recurrence – a pattern that is deepening. We stand in solidarity with our local partners – households, community organisations and local leadership who live through conflict and violence first hand. We want governments, faith institutions and communities to want and work for peace in their societies and to keep hope alive. Peace is not something fluffy and aspirational. Peacebuilding can and does work.

Keeping hope alive: South Sudan case study

Without an explicit focus on peace, there can be no sustainable development. This case study about Christian Aid's work on peace in South Sudan, alongside the accompanying reports, shares some of our story of taking peace seriously. Throughout our work in providing humanitarian assistance and long-term development support, it has become clear that we cannot ignore the reality of violence. Peace and justice matter to us as a faith-based organisation and we seek to respond to real challenges of building peace with integrity, respect, courage and hope. From Violence to Peace lays down our hopeful vision that a more peaceful reality free from poverty, violence and injustice is possible. This study shares key examples of impact and some things we’ve learnt along the way. Download the case study above or view the full report here

Keeping hope alive: Colombia case study

Without an explicit focus on peace, there can be no sustainable development. This case study about Christian Aid's work on peace in Colombia, alongside the accompanying reports, shares some of our story of taking peace seriously. Throughout our work in providing humanitarian assistance and long-term development support, it has become clear that we cannot ignore the reality of violence. Peace and justice matter to us as a faith-based organisation and we seek to respond to real challenges of building peace with integrity, respect, courage and hope. From Violence to Peace lays down our hopeful vision that a more peaceful reality free from poverty, violence and injustice is possible. This study shares key examples of impact and some things we’ve learnt along the way. Download the case study above or view the full report here