Skip to main content

We found 24

Showing 1 - 18

South Africa learning review

Learning from our work in South Africa

Accountable Governance, Power and Human Rights Framework

This document articulates how Christian Aid addresses power imbalances through accountable governance and equipping people to access their rights.

Balancing research and practice in an international NGO

REL Practice Paper 1 Ten Years of Change is a collaborative, long-term practitioner research initiative designed to take place in three countries – Colombia, Kenya and the UK. It is implemented by the Research, Evidence and Learning team at Christian Aid. The research began with the overarching question how are community members and supporters being influenced by, and influencing, processes of social change? Each country team adapted the question to make it relevant to their socio-political context, and designed research at several different levels, from local to national. This paper tells the story of the first three years of Ten Years of Change. It narrates our ideas and ambitions and how we clarified them; how we identified where, by whom and how the study would be implemented; and how we worked with colleagues in other countries to begin to translate our idea into practice. It then discusses the forces that shaped the parallel but distinct evolution of each of the three streams of the study, before reflecting on the challenges of trade-offs and power. It concludes by returning to some of our assumptions about practitioner research, reflecting on how they played out in practice, finally turning to considerations for the next stage of the study.  

Press release: changing the course of under-five mortality in Nigeria

Our Partnership for Improved Child Health (PICH) project in Benue State, Nigeria, closed in August 2019. Read our press release to find out what we achieved and how communities have adapted. Every year, hundreds of thousands of children under the age of five years in Nigeria do not live up to their fifth birthday due to preventable childhood illnesses such as malaria, pneumonia, diarrhoea and severe acute malnutrition. Most under-five death occurs in remote, hard to reach communities where caregivers are faced with physical, social and financial barriers to access health services. Christian Aid , through this project, has empowered communities to take ownership of their own health by improving knowledge and health-seeking behaviour, giving hope in despair, and saving children under five who face imminent death due to barriers of access to and uptake of quality health services.  This project was funded by Christian Aid supporters and UK Aid Match from the UK government. 

SABI Learning Review: Triggering Citizen Action

SABI is a programme operating in all 16 districts of Sierra Leone to increase citizen demands to their governments for the delivery of basic services. This learning review asked the question – has SABI succeeded in supporting community citizen action for effective governance and improved public services? It draws on SABI’s database of 786 community action plans, and interviews and groups discussions with implementing partners, youth accountability volunteers and community members.

Kenya prequalification of suppliers 2019-20

Christian Aid Kenya invites interested and eligible suppliers to apply for pre-qualification indicating the category of goods and services as they wish to supply.  Existing suppliers who wish to be retained must also re-apply and submit information requested in the prequalification document.  

Research brokers in fair and equitable research partnerships

Funding for research in international development often includes a focus on fair and equitable partnerships. Academics from the global North are increasingly encouraged by funders to include academic partners based in the global South and civil society practitioners in their research projects. But achieving this is complicated: partnership and research are both political. This module is one of a set of resources that has been designed to help academics, NGOs, CSOs, research brokers and funders put principles for fair and equitable research partnerships into practice. It is aimed at research brokers, organisations that facilitate research partnerships by playing a brokering, technical support or capacity development role. It asks what research brokers bring to research partnerships and describes challenges they commonly encounter. It goes on to provide a checklist of questions for research brokers to ask at each stage of a research process, two tools that they will find useful for reflection, and short summaries of other useful publications.

Funders in fair and equitable research partnerships

Funding for research in international development often includes a focus on fair and equitable partnerships. Academics from the global North are increasingly encouraged by funders to include academic partners based in the global South and civil society practitioners in their research projects. But achieving this is complicated: partnership and research are both political. This module is one of a set of resources that has been designed to help academics, NGOs, CSOs, research brokers and funders put principles for fair and equitable research partnerships into practice. It is aimed at research funders, in particular on the bodies that make up UK Research and Innovation, and specifically their remits under the Global Challenges Research Fund and the Newton Fund. It asks what funders bring to research partnerships and describes challenges they commonly encounter. It goes on to provide a checklist of questions for funders to ask at each stage of a research process, two tools that they will find useful for reflection, and short summaries of other useful publications.

UK-based academics in fair and equitable research partnerships

Funding for research in international development often includes a focus on fair and equitable partnerships. Academics from the global North are increasingly encouraged by funders to include academic partners based in the global South and civil society practitioners in their research projects. But achieving this is complicated: partnership and research are both political. This module is one of a set of resources that has been designed to help academics, NGOs, CSOs, research brokers and funders put principles for fair and equitable research partnerships into practice. It is aimed at UK-based academics, those working in research roles in a university or higher education institute. It asks what UK-based academics bring to international development research partnerships and describes challenges they commonly encounter. It goes on to provide a checklist of questions for UK-based academics to ask at each stage of a research process, two tools that they will find useful for reflection, and short summaries of other useful publications.

Southern academics in fair and equitable research partnerships

Funding for research in international development often includes a focus on fair and equitable partnerships. Academics from the global North are increasingly encouraged by funders to include academic partners based in the global South and civil society practitioners in their research projects. But achieving this is complicated: partnership and research are both political. This module is one of a set of resources that has been designed to help academics, NGOs, CSOs, research brokers and funders put principles for fair and equitable research partnerships into practice. It is aimed at academics based in universities in the global South. It asks what academics based in the global South bring to research partnerships and describes challenges they commonly encounter. It goes on to provide a checklist of questions for academics based in the global South to ask at each stage of a research process, two tools that they will find useful for reflection, and short summaries of other useful publications.

Southern CSOs in fair and equitable research partnerships

Funding for research in international development often includes a focus on fair and equitable partnerships. Academics from the global North are increasingly encouraged by funders to include academic partners based in the global South and civil society practitioners in their research projects. But achieving this is complicated: partnership and research are both political. This module is one of a set of resources that has been designed to help academics, NGOs, CSOs, research brokers and funders put principles for fair and equitable research partnerships into practice. It is aimed CSOs in the global South with a development focus, which may be expressed in terms of poverty alleviation or human rights. It asks what CSOs in the global South bring to research partnerships and describes challenges they commonly encounter. It goes on to provide a checklist of questions for Southern CSOs to ask at each stage of a research process, two tools that they will find useful for reflection, and short summaries of other useful publications.

International NGOs in fair and equitable research partnerships

Funding for research in international development often includes a focus on fair and equitable partnerships. Academics from the global North are increasingly encouraged by funders to include academic partners based in the global South and civil society practitioners in their research projects. But achieving this is complicated: partnership and research are both political. This module is one of a set of resources that has been designed to help academics, NGOs, CSOs, research brokers and funders put principles for fair and equitable research partnerships into practice. It is aimed at international NGOs, non-profit organisations performing a variety of service, humanitarian and advocacy functions, across multiple countries in a global context. It asks what international NGOs bring to research partnerships and describes challenges they commonly encounter. It goes on to provide a checklist of questions for international NGOs to ask at each stage of a research process, two tools that they will find useful for reflection, and short summaries of other useful publications.

Introduction to fair and equitable research partnerships

Funding for research in international development often includes a focus on fair and equitable partnerships. Academics from the global North are increasingly encouraged by funders to include academic partners based in the global South and civil society practitioners in their research projects. But achieving this is complicated: partnership and research are both political. This introduction is the first in a set of resources that has been designed to help academics, NGOs, CSOs, research brokers and funders put principles for fair and equitable research partnerships into practice. It describes what fair and equitable research partnerships are and why they are important, before introducing eight principles for working towards this kind of partnership. It goes on to outline the structure of the six modules in the resource set of resources and suggest guidance for their use. 

Fair and equitable research partnerships case study: Dr Bhavani

Funding for research in international development often includes a focus on fair and equitable partnerships. Academics from the global North are increasingly encouraged by funders to include academic partners based in the global South and civil society practitioners in their research projects. But achieving this is complicated: partnership and research are both political. This case study is one of a set of resources that has been designed to help academics, NGOs, CSOs, research brokers and funders put principles for fair and equitable research partnerships into practice. The case study explores insights from Dr Bhavani RV of the of the M.S.Swaminathan Research Foundation (MSSRF) in India, project manager for Leveraging Agriculture for Nutrition in South Asia (LANSA), an international research partnership funded by the UK Department for International Development (DFID) (2012–18). After situating the organisational identity of MSSRF and its involvement as lead agency in the LANSA research programme consortium, Dr Bhavani explores several learning points relating to fair and equitable research partnerships – from negotiation of ethical considerations to adaptation of research approach and consortium governance. Finally, she reflects on ways in which MSSRF has both contributed and benefited from involvement in the LANSA research consortium.  

Fair and equitable research partnerships case study: Eric Gutierrez

Funding for research in international development often includes a focus on fair and equitable partnerships. Academics from the global North are increasingly encouraged by funders to include academic partners based in the global South and civil society practitioners in their research projects. But achieving this is complicated: partnership and research are both political. This case study is one of a set of resources that has been designed to help academics, NGOs, CSOs, research brokers and funders put principles for fair and equitable research partnerships into practice. The case study explores insights from Eric Gutierrez of Christian Aid, who was involved in a successful application to the Global Challenges Research Fund for a research project looking at the way economies transition from war to peace. The project is led by SOAS University of London, a respected UK university. Christian Aid became involved in the project because it had previously worked with SOAS to commission research. In this case study, Eric reflects on the experience of being involved in the research application process. He talks about the time and work involved in the application, the challenges of tight deadlines, and the structural barriers that limited Christian Aid’s role. He discusses on Christian Aid’s experience in lobbying for policy change, and how this kind of work can be overlooked by academic actors with less experience of ensuring that research leads to policy change.

Fair and equitable research partnerships case study: Kate Newman

Funding for research in international development often includes a focus on fair and equitable partnerships. Academics from the global North are increasingly encouraged by funders to include academic partners based in the global South and civil society practitioners in their research projects. But achieving this is complicated: partnership and research are both political. This case study is one of a set of resources that has been designed to help academics, NGOs, CSOs, research brokers and funders put principles for fair and equitable research partnerships into practice. The case study explores insights from Kate Newman of Christian Aid, who reflects on her experience of participating in an moderator panel for the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC), convened to make funding recommendations to the AHRC based on a ‘Network Plus’ call funded by the Global Challenges Research Fund. It was Kate’s first time on an academic moderator panel, and she found the experience very challenging. She was not clear about her specific role on the panel (was she there to represent a civil society voice, or as an individual participating in a panel?), there were no clear criteria against which the proposals should be evaluated, and there were vastly different expectations of academic research and development impact across the panel. Kate asks questions and makes recommendations for future panels to enable better participation of civil society representatives on similar panels.

Fair and equitable research partnerships case study: RRC

Funding for research in international development often includes a focus on fair and equitable partnerships. Academics from the global North are increasingly encouraged by funders to include academic partners based in the global South and civil society practitioners in their research projects. But achieving this is complicated: partnership and research are both political. This case study is one of a set of resources that has been designed to help academics, NGOs, CSOs, research brokers and funders put principles for fair and equitable research partnerships into practice. It explores insights from the Rethinking Research Collaborative (RRC), an informal network of academics, civil society practitioners, international NGOs and research support providers from the UK and many other countries who are committed to improving research in response to global challenges. It presents reflections on the strengths and challenges of the RRC's efforts to model a fair and equitable research partnership in the research that forms the foundation of this set of resources. It is structured around the eight principles for fair and equitable partnership identified by the RRC, and is therefore a retrospective reflection on applying these principles in practice.

Fair and equitable research partnerships case study: Tom Kariuki

Funding for research in international development often includes a focus on fair and equitable partnerships. Academics from the global North are increasingly encouraged by funders to include academic partners based in the global South and civil society practitioners in their research projects. But achieving this is complicated: partnership and research are both political. This case study is one of a set of resources that has been designed to help academics, NGOs, CSOs, research brokers and funders put principles for fair and equitable research partnerships into practice. The case study explores insights from Tom Kariuki of the African Academy of Sciences (AAS). Tom describes the vision of the AAS and the evolution of the Alliance for Accelerating Excellence in Science in Africa (AESA), an agenda-setting and funding platform. He reflects on the impact of shifting the centre of gravity for African science to Africa, issues of trust which limit funders’ interest in devolving fund management to African organisations, and the importance of investing in institutional capacity to enable sustainable research leadership in Africa.