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Racing to End Poverty

The global impact of Covid-19 adversely affected programme delivery across the world in 2020. However, despite the negative impact of the pandemic, the worsening security situation and dwindling donor funding, Christian Aid Nigeria made giant strides in d

Bridging the gap

Fiscal justice in sexual and reproductive health and rights in Africa. 

Modern Slavery Statement

Christian Aid's Modern Slavery Statement

Christian Aid - Scottish Parliament Elections Manifesto 2021

For the last 75 years, our experience in Africa, Asia and Latin America has shown us that poverty is the result of unequal access to power and resources. That is why we are engaging with all political parties to seek global change.

PARTNERSHIP: CALL FOR EXPRESSION OF INTEREST

is specifically looking for organisations with demonstrated experience and evidence-based success in Health and Human Development Work.

Angola: An exit learning review

This review seeks to celebrate the Angola programme’s thirty-seven years of work.

Volunteer Privacy Notice

Christian Aid collects and processes the personal data of our volunteers to manage the volunteer relationship. As we’re committed to being transparent about how we meet our data protection obligations, you can find more information about how we collect and use that data in our privacy notice.

Attending a webinar

Christian Aid runs lots of webinars, online talks and training for our volunteers – but if you’ve never attended one before, you might be a little worried about what to expect.  In this handy guide, you’ll learn how to connect and participate in these online sessions, what you’ll see on your screen and where you can get further help.

Black Lives Matter Everywhere

Apart from the Covid-19 pandemic, the rise of the Black Lives Matter movement has been one of the defining themes of 2020. Sparked by the death of George Floyd and other examples of police brutality in the United States, it quickly spread to include a wider debate about racial inequalities around the world. Climate change, although something which will affect us all, is a deeply racialised phenomenon. Black and brown people in the poorest countries face the brunt of the impacts, caused in large part by fossil fuel burning in rich, majority-White nations. But this inequality is often overlooked because climate change is associated with science and the language used to describe it is often technical jargon relating to atmospheric carbon atoms and global temperature readings. The cold neutrality of climate science obscures the fact that the drivers and impacts of the climate emergency are personal and societal, and tied to political decisions with clear racial implications. People in the, as-yet, more sheltered corners of the global North are now starting to experience the force of the climate crisis, but across the global South it is something they have already been feeling the effects of for years. Be they extreme weather events in Latin America, droughts in East Africa, floods in Bangladesh or sea level rise threatening the existence of Pacific Islands, climate change is not just a future threat but a present reality. Climate change and its disproportionate effects on those that have done the least to cause it has been known about for decades. And yet emissions continue to rise. If poor political decisions and unjust policies have helped to cause the climate crisis, then it’s equally the case that the right policies and decisions have an essential role to play in addressing the problem and putting the world on a path to climate justice. We’re beginning to see such movement, although not nearly fast enough. Politicians around the world have claimed to be moved by racial injustice. Making rapid and far reaching climate action a priority would be a good start in ensuring black lives matter everywhere.

Identifying the most vulnerable

Following the Corona Virus Global Pandemic, Christian Aid is responding to a DFID call to support preparedness and response to primary and secondary impacts of COVID-19 on the most vulnerable Households (HHs) and communities in Benue, Borno and Kaduna states. This is a five-month rapid response project funded by DFID and being implemented by Christian Aid Nigeria and Afghanistan through local partners.

Song of the prophets

A global theology of climate change

Evidence Report: Project Maria Caicedo

Development of inclusive markets to build peace in Colombia. The case of the Peasant Reserve Zones of the Cimitarra River Valley, Catatumbo and Tulua.

Informe de evidencia: Proyecto María Caicedo

Desarrollo de mercados inclusivos para construir paz en Colombia. El caso de las Zonas de Reserva Campesina del Valle del Río Cimitarra, Catatumbo y Tuluá

Desarollo de mercados inclusivos para construir paz en Colombia

Colombia es el mayor productor de hoja de coca del mundo. Desde el 2000, Estados Unidos ha asignado 10.000 millones de dólares en un intento por detener su producción, y se han fumigado más de 1,6 millones de hectáreas en un intento por erradicar las plantaciones de coca. Sin embargo, la superficie cultivada en el país ha aumentado en un promedio de 45% por año - con 177.000 hectáreas en 2017 que se utilizan para el cultivo de coca. Como es evidente, la lucha contra las drogas ha fracasado. Trabajando en las Zonas de Reserva Campesina del Valle del Río Cimitarra, Catatumbo y Tuluá, el Proyecto María Caicedo trabaja para la transformación de las economías de guerra en economías de paz. El proyecto se diseñó para captar la voz de los que quedaron atrás (a través de los años de conflicto en Colombia, y por los esfuerzos subsiguientes para traer la paz) y se involucraron en las economías ilegales en la Colombia rural. Esta investigación proporcionó elementos clave para contribuir a la construcción de paz en Colombia a través de la transformación de las economías de guerra en economías de paz en las Zonas de Reserva Campesina (ZRC). Adoptamos un enfoque sistémico, que involucra los sistemas políticos y económicos a nivel local y nacional, buscando dar a las personas más marginadas una voz y, en última instancia, poder para salir de la pobreza. Estos informes, tanto en inglés como en español, muestran los resultados de nuestra investigación y cómo Colombia puede avanzar hacia economías de paz. Este reporte muestra un resumen de los resultados del Proyecto. Para leer el reporte completo, haga clic aquí. 

Development of Inclusive Markets to Build Peace in Colombia

Colombia is the largest producer of coca leaf in the world. Since 2000, United States has allocated USD 10 billion in an attempt to stop its production, with more than 1.6 million hectares being sprayed in an attempt to eradicate coca plantations. But the cultivated area in the country has increased by an average of 45% per year – with 177,000 hectares in 2017 being used for growing coca. As is evident, the fight against drugs has failed. Working in the Peasant Reserve Zones of the Cimitarra River Valley, Catatumbo and Tuluá, Project Maria Caicedo works towards the transformation of war economies into peace economies. The project was designed to capture the voice of those left behind (through the years of conflict in Colombia, and by the subsequent efforts to bring peace) and involved in illegal economies in the rural Colombia. This research provided key building blocks in the foundation of peace in Colombia through the transformation of war economies to peace economies in Peasant Reserve Areas (ZRC, by its acronym in Spanish). We  took a systemic approach, which involved the political and economic systems at the local and national levels, seeking to give the most marginalised people a voice and ultimately power to emerge from poverty. This report gives a summary of the project's findings. For the full report, click here.