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Christian Aid Zimbabwe SMT

The team behind Christian Aid Zimbabwe

UK Climate Fair Share

This technical paper describes the calculations behind an infographic (2020) that describes the UK's 'Fair Share' of emissions reduction to meet the targets of the Paris Agreement. It includes  a memo provided by the Climate Equity Reference Project, which carried out the fair shares analysis based on the Climate Equity Reference Framework. The memo describes the global mitigation pathway and the effort sharing framework used, and shows results for the UK. It also describes the assumptions and judgements taken by the UK groups that jointly produced the infographic, for making conclusions about  financial resources required for the UK to implement its fair share.    

The UK's climate fair share

Infographic showing the scale of the UK’s responsibility for addressing the climate crisis, requiring ambitious action at home and overseas. Please find a background document here.

Pathways to Localisation: locally led humanitarian response (English)

This paper presents a synthesis of the four national frameworks into one global localisation framework relevant for humanitarian practitioners, policy-makers and decision-makers. It outlines: The notable differences between the four national localisation frameworks, and reflect the diverse contexts specific to the very different operating environments and humanitarian crises in Myanmar, Nepal, Nigeria and South Sudan. A number of priority actions and areas common across the four frameworks, many of which link closely to existing localisation commitments, frameworks, and indicators which are referenced. The key areas included in all four national localisation frameworks, along with objectives, priority actions, and potential indicators.

Pathways to Localisation: locally led humanitarian response (Arabic)

This Arabic-language paper presents a synthesis of the four national frameworks into one global localisation framework relevant for humanitarian practitioners, policy-makers and decision-makers. It outlines: The notable differences between the four national localisation frameworks, and reflect the diverse contexts specific to the very different operating environments and humanitarian crises in Myanmar, Nepal, Nigeria and South Sudan. A number of priority actions and areas common across the four frameworks, many of which link closely to existing localisation commitments, frameworks, and indicators which are referenced. The key areas included in all four national localisation frameworks, along with objectives, priority actions, and potential indicators.

Pathways to Localisation: locally led humanitarian response (Myanmar)

This Myanmar-language paper presents a synthesis of the four national frameworks into one global localisation framework relevant for humanitarian practitioners, policy-makers and decision-makers. It outlines: The notable differences between the four national localisation frameworks, and reflect the diverse contexts specific to the very different operating environments and humanitarian crises in Myanmar, Nepal, Nigeria and South Sudan. A number of priority actions and areas common across the four frameworks, many of which link closely to existing localisation commitments, frameworks, and indicators which are referenced. The key areas included in all four national localisation frameworks, along with objectives, priority actions, and potential indicators.

Pathways to Localisation: locally led humanitarian response (Nepali)

This Nepali-language paper presents a synthesis of the four national frameworks into one global localisation framework relevant for humanitarian practitioners, policy-makers and decision-makers. It outlines: The notable differences between the four national localisation frameworks, and reflect the diverse contexts specific to the very different operating environments and humanitarian crises in Myanmar, Nepal, Nigeria and South Sudan. A number of priority actions and areas common across the four frameworks, many of which link closely to existing localisation commitments, frameworks, and indicators which are referenced. The key areas included in all four national localisation frameworks, along with objectives, priority actions, and potential indicators.

Migraciones climáticas en el Corredor Seco Centroamericano

This is the orignial Spanish version of a study that examines the relationship between three factors – migration, gender and climate change – in the Central American Dry Corridor (Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras and Nicaragua). Although there is a vast body of literature that addreses each of these factors individually, other studies have not looked at the links between the three. This report is divided into four sections. The first provides the background and context of the Dry Corridor in order to explain why the variables analysed were chosen. The second includes the main testimonies gathered in each of the countries during the fieldwork. The third sets out the main conclusions, and the final section includes a series of recommendations for the inclusion of a gender equality perspective in public policies on climate change.

Climate migration in the Dry Corridor of Central America

This study examines the relationship between three factors – migration, gender and climate change – in the Central American Dry Corridor (Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras and Nicaragua). Although there is a vast body of literature that addreses each of these factors individually, other studies have not looked at the links between the three. This report is divided into four sections. The first provides the background and context of the Dry Corridor in order to explain why the variables analysed were chosen. The second includes the main testimonies gathered in each of the countries during the fieldwork. The third sets out the main conclusions, and the final section includes a series of recommendations for the inclusion of a gender equality perspective in public policies on climate change.

Partnerships for humanitarian action: challenges for large INGOs

Read the notes from the January 2020 roundtable held to discuss the challenges for large INGOs without a traditional partnership approach. This paper contains: Notes from the roundtable, co-hosted by the Accelerating Localisation through Partnerships programme and the Humanitarian Policy Group (HPG) of ODI, in January 2020. The roundtable aimed to discuss the challenges for large international NGOs, without a traditional partnership approach, moving towards partnerships in humanitarian contexts in pursuit of localisation.

Another chance to live and thrive

Amina Sani lost everything when Boko Haram attacked her village in 2015. Like many other people living in Gora, Shani Borno State Nigeria, Amina and her family returned to their village with all means of livelihood gone, everything destroyed. As a mother of 7, making a living as a potter proved hard. So, when Amina was enlisted to be part of a saving and loans scheme, and trained in business skills, supported by Christian Aid and WFP, she was extremely grateful. ‘May Christian Aid live long’. Amina prays. To support her children, Amina has remained extremely committed to the saving and loans scheme. With an initial seed fund of N12,000, Amina borrowed a further N5,000 from friends, just enough to start a grain business. Within weeks of buying and selling grain, Amina paid back her loan and invested in buying mobile network cards, which she now sells as well as grain. Now, when Amina sells her grain, she makes N1,000 per bag. The mobile network cards are also profitable, and she makes 10% profit on her investments in this area of her business. ‘Being a member of Christian Aid’s saving and loans scheme was a turning point in my life’, Amina says. She explains that making clay and pottery was previously not profitable, and that her new business has made life much easier for her and for her family. It has given her another chance to live and thrive. ‘My children now eat well’ Amina explains, and she is happy that her last child is active and happy. Amina is one of many women from Gora Village, Shani Borno State who have turned their lives around through the support of this project.

Giving Hope to People in Conflict

Christian Aid Blanket Supplementary Feeding Program (BSFP) project provided immediate life-saving food and nutrition assistance to breast-feeding and children under the age of five years.

Christian Aid expectations for COP25

Christian Aid's key asks for the COP25 climate conference in Madrid, Spain, December 2019. The past 18 months have seen a flurry of new scientific information on the state of the climate. Severe climate impacts are already being experienced, particularly by the poorest and most vulnerable. Communities and ecosystems are already suffering devastation even at the current 1ºC of warming. The fires in the Amazon, Congo and California, the South Asian floods, and other extreme weather events, like cyclones Idai and Fani, point to a climate system already in crisis. The world is in a state of climate emergency. The climate emergency is real and efforts to take action now must be a priority. We call on governments to make a step change in their climate ambition and in the support given to help developing countries achieve it. Key asks Mitigation All countries to recognise the scale of the climate challenge and the need for a fair global effort to achieve the Paris 1.5ºC goal. The Conference of Parties (COP) to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change should deliver a mandate for all countries to enhance the mitigation part of their Nationally-determined contributions (NDCs) in line with the 1.5ºC goal. The common time frame should be in five-year cycles. Long-term strategies should include landscape analyses to plan for nature-based solutions, to increase resilience, and to store and sequester carbon. Finance Adequate climate finance is a prerequisite to greater ambition in poor countries. Developed countries need to step up in providing adequate public finance to both help build resilience, but also to allow clean development and fulfillment – and exceedance - of the conditional parts of the NDCs. Loss and damage The Warsaw International Mechanism on Loss and Damage (WIM) should put greater focus on averting loss and damage than on post-event addressing of it. New, additional and adequate sources of climate finance are needed to enhance action. The potential of nature-based solutions for resilience should be given greater consideration and implementation priority. Adaptation Developing countries should be supported to complete and implement country-driven, gender-responsive, participatory and transparent adaptation plans. The overall financial flows, as well as the proportion of finance for adaptation need to be increased to allow vulnerable people, communities and ecosystems to adapt to the changing climate. Article 6 Rather than rely on ‘flexibility’ mechanisms, countries should instead focus on making transformational changes to their economies. Kyoto credits should play no role in any Paris mechanisms. Article 6 provisions should be adopted as a package. The Article 6 mechanisms should explicitly recognise the non-fungibility of fossil and biological carbon and prevent trade between them. Strong social and environmental safeguards are essential to be agreed before use of flexibility mechanisms. Nature-based solutions COP should recognise the potential co-benefits of nature-based solutions, as detailed in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) reports, and agree means to promote their implementation Nature-based solutions for mitigation should not be seen as an alternative to ending the use of fossil fuels. It should be seen as an additional and precautionary approach, with other co-benefits, including for resilience. Appropriate links with the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) and UN Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD)’s provisions should be made, and coherent implementation encouraged. Gender and Climate The revision must ensure that gender balance approaches are adopted under all the bodies of the convention. Download the full briefing here

Partnership practices for localisation: guidance notes (English)

The top 23 partnership practices for localisation are listed in this guidance note under the areas of project and financial management, capacity strengthening and sharing, financing, coordination, safety and security, and advocacy.  These notes are available in English, French, Spanish, Arabic, Myanmar and Nepali, from the Accelerating Localisation through Partnerships project page.

Pathways to Localisation: locally-led humanitarian action (English)

This paper outlines eight priority actions for partnership-based humanitarian action, and five actions for an enabling environment, for locally-led humanitarian action.  It is informed by more than 400 humanitarian agencies – the majority of them local and national organisations – through research, piloting and the development of National Localisation Frameworks, in Myanmar, Nepal, Nigeria and South Sudan.  It outlines priority actions and a range of indicators under the areas of partnerships, capacity, financial resources, and coordination.  This paper outlines eight priority actions for partnership-based humanitarian action, and five actions for an enabling environment, for locally-led humanitarian action. It is available in English, French, Spanish, Arabic, Myanmar and Nepali, from the Accelerating Localisation through Partnerships project page. Who is it for? This paper is relevant for all those implementing and funding humanitarian response. It was developed as part of the Accelerating Localisation through Partnerships project implemented by Christian Aid, CARE, Tearfund, ActionAid, CAFOD and Oxfam, guided by national steering committees, and funded by the European Commission’s Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid Operations (ECHO) over 2017-2019.

Christian Aid Ethiopia Annual Report 2018/19

This report shows the impact of our work and testimonies that show how Christian Aid Ethiopia is supporting the most vulnerable communities in hard to reach parts of the country. It highlights out work on humanitarian response, DRR, strengthening climate services to farmers and pastoral communities, markets development and our work on promoting gender sensitive programming and support to communities to challenge power structures and systems that perpetuate gender violence. 

Christian Aid Nigeria programme strategy: 2019-2026

An overview of the vision, mission and strategy of the Christian Aid Nigeria programme for 2019-2026. For the next seven years, we will continue Standing Together with the most marginalised and vulnerable people to ensure everyone has the opportunity to live a full life and poverty is eradicated. Our essential purpose as an organisation is to see an end to poverty, and Christian Aid Nigeria is committed to seeing this become a reality. This new strategy will guide our activities and help us tackle the power imbalance that perpetuates poverty in Nigeria.

Vers la localisation (Pathways to localisation - French)

Cadre visant à une intervention humanitaire menée à l’échelle locale et fondée sur le partenariat. This paper outlines eight priority actions for partnership-based humanitarian action, and five actions for an enabling environment, for locally-led humanitarian action. It is available in English, French, Spanish, Arabic, Myanmar and Nepali, from the Accelerating Localisation through Partnerships project page. Note de synthèse  Le Sommet Humanitaire Mondial (WHS) de 2016 a souligné le rôle primordial des acteurs locaux et nationaux dans l’intervention humanitaire. Les trois grandes séries d’engagements qui y ont été prises, à savoir le Programme d’Action pour l’Humanité (2016), le Grand Compromis (2016) et la Charte pour le Changement (2015), ont énoncé les changements ou les transformations nécessaires pour permettre aux acteurs locaux et nationaux de prendre davantage les rênes de l’action humanitaire.   À l’initiative du consortium formé de Christian Aid, CARE, Tearfund, ActionAid, CAFOD et Oxfam, Accelerating Localisation through Partnerships est un programme orienté par les acteurs locaux et nationaux qui siègent dans des comités nationaux de pilotage. La Protection Civile et Opérations d’Aide de la Commission Européenne (ECHO) l’a financé de la fin 2017 à 2019. Ce programme s’inspire de travaux du consortium qui depuis 2012, par le biais de la série de rapports Missed Opportunities, visent à renforcer le rôle moteur des acteurs locaux et nationaux dans l’action humanitaire.   À l’issue de ses recherches, le programme Accelerating Localisation through Partnerships a mis en évidence un modèle fondé sur les pratiques de partenariat qui, selon les acteurs locaux/nationaux, favorisent le plus la localisation4. Pour les besoins de ces travaux, plus de 350 organisations au Myanmar, au Népal, au Nigeria et au Soudan du Sud, dont 85 % sont des organisations locales et nationales, ont été consultées. Elles ont permis aux membres du consortium et à leurs partenaires locaux de repérer, de valider et d’expérimenter un certain nombre de recommandations. Les leçons tirées de la phase d’expérimentation ont été regroupées avec les conclusions des auto-évaluations des capacités de plus d’une centaine d’acteurs locaux et nationaux. Les recherches, les leçons et les conclusions du programme ont façonné l’élaboration de cadres nationaux de localisation. Les acteurs locaux et nationaux, et d’autres intervenants humanitaires, y compris des ONG internationales, des agences des Nations Unies, des donateurs, les sociétés de la Croix-Rouge et du Croissant-Rouge, et les autorités gouvernementales concernées y ont également contribué.   Les quatre cadres nationaux de localisation sont adaptés au contexte très différencié des environnements opérationnels et des crises humanitaires au Myanmar, au Népal, au Nigeria et au Soudan du Sud. Les écarts notables entre les quatre cadres nationaux de localisation sont présentés dans ce document et reflètent la diversité des contextes. Les différences tiennent particulièrement au rôle des autorités gouvernementales dans la localisation. Cependant, ces quatre cadres ont en commun un certain nombre d’actions et de domaines prioritaires, dont plusieurs sont étroitement liés aux engagements, aux cadres et aux indicateurs de localisation existants et cités en référence. Alors que le programme Accelerating Localisation through Partnerships était axé sur l’action humanitaire fondée sur le partenariat, les cadres nationaux de localisation sont allés bien au-delà. Ce rapport présente les principaux domaines traités dans les quatre cadres nationaux de localisation, ainsi que leurs objectifs, leurs actions prioritaires et leurs indicateurs potentiels.  Note d’orientation sur les pratiques de partenariat en vue de la localisation.