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Gender, Inclusion, Power & Politics (GIPP) Toolkit - Part One - Guide

GIPP is an analysis tool developed by Christian Aid and Social Development Direct, through the ECID programme.

Gender, Inclusion, Power & Politics (GIPP) Toolkit - Part Two - Toolkit

GIPP is an analysis tool developed by Christian Aid and Social Development Direct, through the Evidence and Collaboration for Inclusive Development (ECID) programme, funded by UK Aid.

Building Trusted Partnerships for Healthy and Resilient Communities

The health legacy project is implemented in five African countries; Burundi, Sierra Leone and South Sudan, Nigeria and Kenya. By August 2019 the project had completed two years of implementation. The project addresses the issue of gender justice, promotes equitable social norms and institutions, and improves accountability by building the agency of citizens. Evidence has shown the project to have positive impacts on lives of our beneficiaries and their communities. This includes improved resilience of families and communities, especially those in fragile and resource-challenged settings. They are better prepared in terms of ability to anticipate, identify, and respond to health risks.

Christian Aid annual report and accounts 2018/19

Our Annual Report gives details of Christian Aid's objectives, key successes, challenges and accounts for 2018-19.

Keeping hope alive: Christian Aid's work on peace - Impact study 2019

Without an explicit focus on peace, there can be no sustainable development. This Impact Study, and accompanying case studies, share some of our story of taking peace seriously. Throughout our work in providing humanitarian assistance and long-term development support, it has become clear that we cannot ignore the reality of violence. Peace and justice matter to us as a faith-based organisation and we seek to respond to real challenges of building peace with integrity, respect, courage and hope. From Violence to Peace lays down our hopeful vision that a more peaceful reality free from poverty, violence and injustice is possible. This study shares key examples of impact and some things we’ve learnt along the way. Key facts In 2016, more countries experienced violent conflict than at any time in nearly 30 years. If current trends persist, by 2030 – the horizon set by the Sustainable Development Goals – more than half of the world’s poor will be living in countries affected by high levels of violence. (OECD). Violent conflict has spiked since 2010, with two billion people now living in countries where development outcomes are affected by fragility, conflict, and violence (World Bank, 2018). Much of this violence is due to recurring violence and protracted conflicts. It is estimated that 135 different countries have experienced conflict recurrence – a pattern that is deepening. We stand in solidarity with our local partners – households, community organisations and local leadership who live through conflict and violence first hand. We want governments, faith institutions and communities to want and work for peace in their societies and to keep hope alive. Peace is not something fluffy and aspirational. Peacebuilding can and does work.

Breaking the barriers programme overview

Over the past decade, Christian Aid and its partners have worked with communities without access to energy across Africa and Latin America. We have achieved this through the installation, distribution and integration of sustainable energy products and technologies in our programmes. We provide innovative financing models, as well as business and technical assistance.  

Partnership for Change: Christian Aid in Kenya

Christian Aid has been working in Kenya since 1997, in partnership with local civil society agencies, public authorities, private sector actors, churches and other religious organisations. We are working to build community capacities and create enabling environments in which men, women and children can thrive and break out of chronic cycles of poverty.

Humanitarian inclusion standards

The humanitarian inclusion standards for older people and people with disabilities were developed by the Age and Disability Capacity Programme (ADCAP), an initiative of the Age and Disability Consortium. These standards provide practitioners and organisations with clear actions that can be taken to protect, support and engage older people and people with disabilities and help us all realise these commitments. They provide guidance to identify and overcome barriers to participation and access in diverse contexts, and at all stages of the humanitarian programme cycle.

Humanitarian inclusion standards (Arabic)

The humanitarian inclusion standards for older people and people with disabilities were developed by the Age and Disability Capacity Programme (ADCAP), an initiative of the Age and Disability Consortium. These standards provide practitioners and organisations with clear actions that can be taken to protect, support and engage older people and people with disabilities and help us all realise these commitments. They provide guidance to identify and overcome barriers to participation and access in diverse contexts, and at all stages of the humanitarian programme cycle.

Humanitarian inclusion standards (French)

The humanitarian inclusion standards for older people and people with disabilities were developed by the Age and Disability Capacity Programme (ADCAP), an initiative of the Age and Disability Consortium. These standards provide practitioners and organisations with clear actions that can be taken to protect, support and engage older people and people with disabilities and help us all realise these commitments. They provide guidance to identify and overcome barriers to participation and access in diverse contexts, and at all stages of the humanitarian programme cycle.

Good practice guide

This good practice guide has been developed as part of the Age and Disability Capacity Programme (ADCAP), an initiative of the Age and Disability Consortium. This guide shares good practices and challenges that have emerged through the experience of the Age and Disability Capacity Programme (ADCAP) implementing partners, in embedding inclusion of older people and people with disabilities within their humanitarian policies and practices.

ACT Gender Security Guidelines: threats to men, women and LGBTI staff

The global context for humanitarians is becoming more challenging. With targeted attacks on aid workers increasing in recent years, including the rise of reported sexual violence within the sector, our duty of care for staff is ever more important. Sexual violence is never the fault of the survivor. We should remain aware of this when undertaking prevention training, avoiding any tendency to ‘victim blame’.

Faith leaders and family planning report

A report into the major barriers and opportunities for faith leaders engaging with their communities on family planning.

Gender Justice 2017: just and equitable power relations for all

Gender injustice is rooted in unequal power relations and the most pervasive gender inequality is between women and men. Updated 2017 gender strategy. Our vision is to end poverty, and in our corporate strategy Partnership for Change, we identify three main goals which will help us to achieve this: Ensure just power relations Ensure equity and sustainability Ensure resilient and thriving societies Our approach Gender injustice is rooted in unequal power relations and the most pervasive gender inequality is between women and men. Gender injustice violates human rights, constrains choice and agency and negatively impacts upon people’s ability to participate in, contribute to and benefit from development and humanitarian relief. Unless we can help create just and equitable relationships between women and men of all ages and diversities, we will be unable to achieve equitable, sustainable, resilient and thriving societies. Gender justice is, therefore, at the heart of Christian Aid’s work. We also recognise that inequalities intersect and create complex disadvantages that compound gender injustice and poverty. We therefore take an inclusive and intersectional approach that enables us to address how inequalities, such as sexual orientation, ethnicity, age, class, religion, caste and disability, intersect with gender inequality and perpetuate poverty. Through our inclusive approach we can tackle barriers to gender justice that are global, and internal to Christian Aid, in a way that is targeted, sustainable, transformative and ‘leaves no one behind’, as set out in the Sustainable Development Goals. To this end, we continue to focus our work on challenging patriarchy and promoting the empowerment of women and girls, with recognition that men can also be adversely affected by patriarchy and ideals of ‘masculinity’. We also seek to broaden our understanding of gender to include, where relevant, transgender and minority genders, who face increased violence and exclusion.

Christian Aid gender strategy: just and equitable power relations

Our 2017 gender strategy reaffirms and renews our commitment to prioritising gender justice, especially for women and girls, throughout the organisation and in our work.  Our vision is to end poverty, and in our corporate strategy 'Partnership for Change', we identify three main goals which will help us to achieve this: Ensure just power relations Ensure equity and sustainability Ensure resilient and thriving societies Gender injustice is rooted in unequal power relations and the most pervasive gender inequality is between women and men. Gender injustice violates human rights, constrains choice and agency and negatively impacts upon people’s ability to participate in, contribute to and benefit from development and humanitarian relief. Unless we can help create just and equitable relationships between women and men of all ages and diversities, we will be unable to achieve equitable, sustainable, resilient and thriving societies. Gender justice is, therefore, at the heart of Christian Aid’s work. We also recognise that inequalities intersect and create complex disadvantages that compound gender injustice and poverty. We therefore take an inclusive and intersectional approach that enables us to address how inequalities, such as sexual orientation, ethnicity, age, class, religion, caste and disability, intersect with gender inequality and perpetuate poverty.

Christian Aid and the Leave No One Behind Agenda

The call to ‘Leave No One Behind’ puts equity at the heart of the development and humanitarian agenda for the coming decades. At Christian Aid, we have an ambition to see an end to poverty for all but glaring inequalities mean that we are not starting with the level playing field needed to bring about this change. Some groups and individuals have been marginalised or excluded for centuries and need greater attention than others. Without this focus on equity, we will see a continuation of ‘a rising tide that lifts all boats’ approach that excludes millions of the poorest people and deepens the inequalities that drive conflict, poverty and discrimination. This document is a summary of how Christian Aid views the implications of the principle Leave NoOne Behind in its programme practice. It sets out the heritage of work that Christian Aid brings to this commitment, its current approaches, and ways forward as we seek to make the goal of ‘Equality for All’ a reality in and throughout our programmes. Our work is evolving quickly in this area and so we have sought to create a snapshot of where we are now rather than provide extensive details of the work or long guidance documents. Given the entrenched power imbalances that will need to be challenged and changed by action at personal, local, national, regional and global levels, we know this is a long and complex journey but it is one which is at the very heart of our vision.