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Gender, Inclusion, Power & Politics (GIPP) Toolkit - Part One - Guide

GIPP is an analysis tool developed by Christian Aid and Social Development Direct, through the ECID programme.

Gender, Inclusion, Power & Politics (GIPP) Toolkit - Part Two - Toolkit

GIPP is an analysis tool developed by Christian Aid and Social Development Direct, through the Evidence and Collaboration for Inclusive Development (ECID) programme, funded by UK Aid.

Inclusive Peacebuilding - English

Online Training of Trainers for Gender Sensitive Peacebuilding

Inclusive Peacebuilding - Burmese

Online Training of Trainers for Gender Sensitive Peacebuilding

Christian Aid Zimbabwe SMT

The team behind Christian Aid Zimbabwe

Brew and Bake Coffee Morning Guide

A guide to running your own coffee and quiz event, virtually or in person.

Brew and Bake Event Guide

A guide to running your own 'Bake Off' style event virtually or in person.

Pathways to Localisation: locally led humanitarian response (Myanmar)

This Myanmar-language paper presents a synthesis of the four national frameworks into one global localisation framework relevant for humanitarian practitioners, policy-makers and decision-makers. It outlines: The notable differences between the four national localisation frameworks, and reflect the diverse contexts specific to the very different operating environments and humanitarian crises in Myanmar, Nepal, Nigeria and South Sudan. A number of priority actions and areas common across the four frameworks, many of which link closely to existing localisation commitments, frameworks, and indicators which are referenced. The key areas included in all four national localisation frameworks, along with objectives, priority actions, and potential indicators.

Illicit drugs and tough trade-offs in war-to-peace transitions

Millions of marginalised people rely on illicit drug economies - often deeply intertwined with armed conflicts - for their survival. But Agenda 2030, particularly Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 16, makes no mention of illicit drug economies. It is clear that the war on drugs has not worked, and it is increasingly recognised that a new, development-based approach to tackling illicit economies is needed. But at present, the evidence base to inform such policies is weak. This report presents evidence on why illicit drugs are a development issue and why they matter for peacebuilding, before discussing the problem with current approaches, and the implications for drugs, peacebuilding and development policy. Report authors: Ross Eventon and Eric Gutierrez

Socialise to Immunise: boosting vaccination uptake through Facebook

In Myanmar's Kachin state only 54-60% of children under 2 years have received all basic vaccinations. However, the rates for individual vaccination of children is much higher, such as 91.2% for the BCG vaccine.[i] We know that vaccine hesitancy is a complex issue. The WHO identifies three main driving factors; confidence, complacency and convenience. Conventional methods to increase basic child vaccination rates, mostly target caregivers directly to increase people’s knowledge and thus change attitudes and behaviour. Our own research shows that social networks have a strong influence on immunisation behaviour.[ii] An important factor in this respect is the ‘social bandwagon effect’, meaning that caregivers do what everyone does, adhere to the social-cultural norm regarding vaccination, which can be to either follow or not follow the vaccination schedules. The slightest increase in uptake by influential individuals in a group leads to positive spillover in the wider community.[iii] Our Socialise to Immunise project will be piloting and testing an unconventional approach, using Facebook. This interactive approach, based on the premise that the social norm of vaccination behaviour is strongly influenced by peer pressure (social bandwagon), will involve and connect different stakeholders in the vaccination-demand process: caregivers, household decision-makers, community immunisation champions, community members, health care providers. This approach is innovative as it will trial a digital social network which simultaneously addresses the three driving factors as identified by WHO. This update shows how the first stages of the project are progressing and some learnings we are taking forward. [ii] Shi et al., Voluntary vaccination through self organizing behaviors on locally mixed social networks, Scientific Reports 7, 2017 (2665) [iii] Buttenheim AM, Asch DA. Behavioral economics: the key to closing the gap for MDGs 4 and 5? Maternal and child health journal 2013; 17 (4): 581-5 [i] Myanmar Demographic and Health Survey, 2015-2016

Socialize to Immunize project phase 1 two pager

Socialize to Immunize phase 1 two pager

Partnership practices for localisation: guidance notes (Myanmar)

The top 23 partnership practices for localisation are listed in this guidance note. (Myanmar.) These notes are available in English, French, Spanish, Arabic, Myanmar and Nepali, from the Accelerating Localisation through Partnerships project page.

Accelerating localisation research summary - Myanmar-language version

Recommendations for practices that strengthen the leadership of national and local actors in partnership-based humanitarian action in Myanmar. Read the English-language version here

Myanmar: Building a Culture of Dialogue manual - English

A facilitator’s manual to guide dialogue within and between communities in conflict. In Myanmar, violence and protracted conflict – often fuelled by fear, hatred and distrust – have a strong impact on people’s lives. Many years of peace building work make us believe in the importance of dialogue as a tool to build trust and strong relationships. Dialogue provides the opportunity to share feelings, understand different points of view and reflect on situations.   For our project ‘Sagar Wine’ (culture of dialogue) in Rakhine State, we developed a training manual. In three creative and interactive modules with many visuals, participants will explore personal development, understand the dynamics of conflict and practice dialogue facilitation skills. The manual ‘Building a Culture of Dialogue’ is available in English and Burmese language.

Myanmar: Building a culture of dialogue manual - Burmese

A facilitator’s manual to guide dialogue within and between communities in conflict. In Myanmar, violence and protracted conflict – often fuelled by fear, hatred and distrust – have a strong impact on people’s lives. Many years of peace building work make us believe in the importance of dialogue as a tool to build trust and strong relationships. Dialogue provides the opportunity to share feelings, understand different points of view and reflect on situations.   For our project ‘Sagar Wine’ (culture of dialogue) in Rakhine State, we developed a training manual. In three creative and interactive modules with many visuals, participants will explore personal development, understand the dynamics of conflict and practice dialogue facilitation skills. The manual ‘Building a Culture of Dialogue’ is available in English and Burmese language.

Accelerating localisation research summary - Myanmar

Recommendations for practices that strengthen the leadership of national and local actors in partnership-based humanitarian action in Myanmar. Read the Myanmar-language version here