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Window on the World

This resource, designed for primary school teachers, looks at the effects of climate change around the world and close to home.

UK Climate Fair Share

This technical paper describes the calculations behind an infographic (2020) that describes the UK's 'Fair Share' of emissions reduction to meet the targets of the Paris Agreement. It includes  a memo provided by the Climate Equity Reference Project, which carried out the fair shares analysis based on the Climate Equity Reference Framework. The memo describes the global mitigation pathway and the effort sharing framework used, and shows results for the UK. It also describes the assumptions and judgements taken by the UK groups that jointly produced the infographic, for making conclusions about  financial resources required for the UK to implement its fair share.    

Nigerian National Localization Framework

The Nigerian National Localization Framework refered to as ''Operational Framework for Local and International NGOs in Nigeria'' is a product of a project implemented by a consortium of 5 INGOs led by Christian Aid and four others namely Action Aid, CAFOD, Care and Tearfund. The project Accelerated Location Through Partnership (ALTP) was implemented for 2 years (November 2017 to October 2019) with funding from European Commission’s Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid (ECHO).    This document is expected to guide the operations of local and international NGOs within the country.

Generando Empresas y Derechos Humanos

Las prácticas corporativas irresponsables representan graves riesgos para los derechos humanos. A menudo, tienen impactos que afectan a las personas de manera diferente debido a su género, haciendo que las desigualdades que ya experimentan sean aún mayores. En este informe, identificamos estudios de casos, destacamos temas clave sobre el impacto de género de las prácticas corporativas y exploramos su relación con el derecho internacional de los derechos humanos y los marcos relacionados. Creemos que las empresas, en particular las empresas transnacionales, deben hacer valer los derechos humanos y deben ser responsabilizadas por el derecho internacional de los derechos humanos. También creemos que el Marco de Negocios y Derechos Humanos de la ONU, sus mecanismos de implementación, y los estados y entidades comerciales a los que se aplica, deben responder mejor a los impactos negativos de las empresas en los derechos de las mujeres y los géneros marginados.

Engendering Business and Human Rights

The UN Business and Human Rights Framework must respond better to the negative impacts of business on the rights of women.

Briefing paper: 'Sinking Cities, Rising Seas'

What this paper is about This paper looks at eight city case studies across Asia, Africa, the UK and the United States, including cities most vulnerable to climate change. It explores: some of the underlying reasons for those cities' vulnerability the additional impact that climate change will have on their people

Research brokers in fair and equitable research partnerships

Funding for research in international development often includes a focus on fair and equitable partnerships. Academics from the global North are increasingly encouraged by funders to include academic partners based in the global South and civil society practitioners in their research projects. But achieving this is complicated: partnership and research are both political. This module is one of a set of resources that has been designed to help academics, NGOs, CSOs, research brokers and funders put principles for fair and equitable research partnerships into practice. It is aimed at research brokers, organisations that facilitate research partnerships by playing a brokering, technical support or capacity development role. It asks what research brokers bring to research partnerships and describes challenges they commonly encounter. It goes on to provide a checklist of questions for research brokers to ask at each stage of a research process, two tools that they will find useful for reflection, and short summaries of other useful publications.

Funders in fair and equitable research partnerships

Funding for research in international development often includes a focus on fair and equitable partnerships. Academics from the global North are increasingly encouraged by funders to include academic partners based in the global South and civil society practitioners in their research projects. But achieving this is complicated: partnership and research are both political. This module is one of a set of resources that has been designed to help academics, NGOs, CSOs, research brokers and funders put principles for fair and equitable research partnerships into practice. It is aimed at research funders, in particular on the bodies that make up UK Research and Innovation, and specifically their remits under the Global Challenges Research Fund and the Newton Fund. It asks what funders bring to research partnerships and describes challenges they commonly encounter. It goes on to provide a checklist of questions for funders to ask at each stage of a research process, two tools that they will find useful for reflection, and short summaries of other useful publications.

UK-based academics in fair and equitable research partnerships

Funding for research in international development often includes a focus on fair and equitable partnerships. Academics from the global North are increasingly encouraged by funders to include academic partners based in the global South and civil society practitioners in their research projects. But achieving this is complicated: partnership and research are both political. This module is one of a set of resources that has been designed to help academics, NGOs, CSOs, research brokers and funders put principles for fair and equitable research partnerships into practice. It is aimed at UK-based academics, those working in research roles in a university or higher education institute. It asks what UK-based academics bring to international development research partnerships and describes challenges they commonly encounter. It goes on to provide a checklist of questions for UK-based academics to ask at each stage of a research process, two tools that they will find useful for reflection, and short summaries of other useful publications.

Southern academics in fair and equitable research partnerships

Funding for research in international development often includes a focus on fair and equitable partnerships. Academics from the global North are increasingly encouraged by funders to include academic partners based in the global South and civil society practitioners in their research projects. But achieving this is complicated: partnership and research are both political. This module is one of a set of resources that has been designed to help academics, NGOs, CSOs, research brokers and funders put principles for fair and equitable research partnerships into practice. It is aimed at academics based in universities in the global South. It asks what academics based in the global South bring to research partnerships and describes challenges they commonly encounter. It goes on to provide a checklist of questions for academics based in the global South to ask at each stage of a research process, two tools that they will find useful for reflection, and short summaries of other useful publications.

Southern CSOs in fair and equitable research partnerships

Funding for research in international development often includes a focus on fair and equitable partnerships. Academics from the global North are increasingly encouraged by funders to include academic partners based in the global South and civil society practitioners in their research projects. But achieving this is complicated: partnership and research are both political. This module is one of a set of resources that has been designed to help academics, NGOs, CSOs, research brokers and funders put principles for fair and equitable research partnerships into practice. It is aimed CSOs in the global South with a development focus, which may be expressed in terms of poverty alleviation or human rights. It asks what CSOs in the global South bring to research partnerships and describes challenges they commonly encounter. It goes on to provide a checklist of questions for Southern CSOs to ask at each stage of a research process, two tools that they will find useful for reflection, and short summaries of other useful publications.

International NGOs in fair and equitable research partnerships

Funding for research in international development often includes a focus on fair and equitable partnerships. Academics from the global North are increasingly encouraged by funders to include academic partners based in the global South and civil society practitioners in their research projects. But achieving this is complicated: partnership and research are both political. This module is one of a set of resources that has been designed to help academics, NGOs, CSOs, research brokers and funders put principles for fair and equitable research partnerships into practice. It is aimed at international NGOs, non-profit organisations performing a variety of service, humanitarian and advocacy functions, across multiple countries in a global context. It asks what international NGOs bring to research partnerships and describes challenges they commonly encounter. It goes on to provide a checklist of questions for international NGOs to ask at each stage of a research process, two tools that they will find useful for reflection, and short summaries of other useful publications.

Introduction to fair and equitable research partnerships

Funding for research in international development often includes a focus on fair and equitable partnerships. Academics from the global North are increasingly encouraged by funders to include academic partners based in the global South and civil society practitioners in their research projects. But achieving this is complicated: partnership and research are both political. This introduction is the first in a set of resources that has been designed to help academics, NGOs, CSOs, research brokers and funders put principles for fair and equitable research partnerships into practice. It describes what fair and equitable research partnerships are and why they are important, before introducing eight principles for working towards this kind of partnership. It goes on to outline the structure of the six modules in the resource set of resources and suggest guidance for their use. 

Fair and equitable research partnerships case study: Dr Bhavani

Funding for research in international development often includes a focus on fair and equitable partnerships. Academics from the global North are increasingly encouraged by funders to include academic partners based in the global South and civil society practitioners in their research projects. But achieving this is complicated: partnership and research are both political. This case study is one of a set of resources that has been designed to help academics, NGOs, CSOs, research brokers and funders put principles for fair and equitable research partnerships into practice. The case study explores insights from Dr Bhavani RV of the of the M.S.Swaminathan Research Foundation (MSSRF) in India, project manager for Leveraging Agriculture for Nutrition in South Asia (LANSA), an international research partnership funded by the UK Department for International Development (DFID) (2012–18). After situating the organisational identity of MSSRF and its involvement as lead agency in the LANSA research programme consortium, Dr Bhavani explores several learning points relating to fair and equitable research partnerships – from negotiation of ethical considerations to adaptation of research approach and consortium governance. Finally, she reflects on ways in which MSSRF has both contributed and benefited from involvement in the LANSA research consortium.  

Fair and equitable research partnerships case study: Eric Gutierrez

Funding for research in international development often includes a focus on fair and equitable partnerships. Academics from the global North are increasingly encouraged by funders to include academic partners based in the global South and civil society practitioners in their research projects. But achieving this is complicated: partnership and research are both political. This case study is one of a set of resources that has been designed to help academics, NGOs, CSOs, research brokers and funders put principles for fair and equitable research partnerships into practice. The case study explores insights from Eric Gutierrez of Christian Aid, who was involved in a successful application to the Global Challenges Research Fund for a research project looking at the way economies transition from war to peace. The project is led by SOAS University of London, a respected UK university. Christian Aid became involved in the project because it had previously worked with SOAS to commission research. In this case study, Eric reflects on the experience of being involved in the research application process. He talks about the time and work involved in the application, the challenges of tight deadlines, and the structural barriers that limited Christian Aid’s role. He discusses on Christian Aid’s experience in lobbying for policy change, and how this kind of work can be overlooked by academic actors with less experience of ensuring that research leads to policy change.

Fair and equitable research partnerships case study: Kate Newman

Funding for research in international development often includes a focus on fair and equitable partnerships. Academics from the global North are increasingly encouraged by funders to include academic partners based in the global South and civil society practitioners in their research projects. But achieving this is complicated: partnership and research are both political. This case study is one of a set of resources that has been designed to help academics, NGOs, CSOs, research brokers and funders put principles for fair and equitable research partnerships into practice. The case study explores insights from Kate Newman of Christian Aid, who reflects on her experience of participating in an moderator panel for the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC), convened to make funding recommendations to the AHRC based on a ‘Network Plus’ call funded by the Global Challenges Research Fund. It was Kate’s first time on an academic moderator panel, and she found the experience very challenging. She was not clear about her specific role on the panel (was she there to represent a civil society voice, or as an individual participating in a panel?), there were no clear criteria against which the proposals should be evaluated, and there were vastly different expectations of academic research and development impact across the panel. Kate asks questions and makes recommendations for future panels to enable better participation of civil society representatives on similar panels.