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Due diligence questionnaire response template

Christian Aid due diligence questionnaire response template

Invitation to tender - global laptop provision

Christian Aid invitation to tender - global laptop provision

Christian Aid supplier code of conduct

Christian Aid supplier code of conduct

Bidder declaration form

Christian Aid bidder declaration form

Code of Conduct - Spanish

Code of Conduct for all Christian Aid staff.

Code of Conduct

The conduct, policies and code of behaviour you are expected to follow as a Christian Aid employee.

No cold calling/ no reply slip (NI)

Editable slip to leave with an envelope at no cold calling houses or when no one is home. Alternatively, you could use the no reply envelope.

No cold calling/ no reply slip

Editable slip to leave with an envelope at no cold calling houses or when no one is home.

Song of the prophets

A global theology of climate change

UK Climate Fair Share

This technical paper describes the calculations behind an infographic (2020) that describes the UK's 'Fair Share' of emissions reduction to meet the targets of the Paris Agreement. It includes  a memo provided by the Climate Equity Reference Project, which carried out the fair shares analysis based on the Climate Equity Reference Framework. The memo describes the global mitigation pathway and the effort sharing framework used, and shows results for the UK. It also describes the assumptions and judgements taken by the UK groups that jointly produced the infographic, for making conclusions about  financial resources required for the UK to implement its fair share.    

Pathways to Localisation: locally led humanitarian response (English)

This paper presents a synthesis of the four national frameworks into one global localisation framework relevant for humanitarian practitioners, policy-makers and decision-makers. It outlines: The notable differences between the four national localisation frameworks, and reflect the diverse contexts specific to the very different operating environments and humanitarian crises in Myanmar, Nepal, Nigeria and South Sudan. A number of priority actions and areas common across the four frameworks, many of which link closely to existing localisation commitments, frameworks, and indicators which are referenced. The key areas included in all four national localisation frameworks, along with objectives, priority actions, and potential indicators.

Pathways to Localisation: locally led humanitarian response (Arabic)

This Arabic-language paper presents a synthesis of the four national frameworks into one global localisation framework relevant for humanitarian practitioners, policy-makers and decision-makers. It outlines: The notable differences between the four national localisation frameworks, and reflect the diverse contexts specific to the very different operating environments and humanitarian crises in Myanmar, Nepal, Nigeria and South Sudan. A number of priority actions and areas common across the four frameworks, many of which link closely to existing localisation commitments, frameworks, and indicators which are referenced. The key areas included in all four national localisation frameworks, along with objectives, priority actions, and potential indicators.

Partnerships for humanitarian action: challenges for large INGOs

Read the notes from the January 2020 roundtable held to discuss the challenges for large INGOs without a traditional partnership approach. This paper contains: Notes from the roundtable, co-hosted by the Accelerating Localisation through Partnerships programme and the Humanitarian Policy Group (HPG) of ODI, in January 2020. The roundtable aimed to discuss the challenges for large international NGOs, without a traditional partnership approach, moving towards partnerships in humanitarian contexts in pursuit of localisation.

Use and abuse of tax breaks: how tax incentives become harmful

Taxation is essential to raise sufficient, equitable and accountable financing for development. Only through taxation can governments fund public spending on the essential services at the quality and scale necessary to realise the rights of all citizens. Yet many Southern governments decide not to tax certain corporations and companies in the hope that this will attract cross-border investment. Despite mounting evidence that the practice of offering tax incentives is both largely ineffective and detrimental to development, it is widespread. This report explains how tax incentives can become harmful, and discusses what can be done to stop their abuse.

Modern Slavery Act

To tackle the root causes of modern slavery is to tackle the root causes of economic and social inequality. This Modern Slavery Statement outlines our continued work in our own supply chains. We have reviewed progress from our previous statement in 2018-19, and set new targets and commitments for 2019-20 onwards You can also read our previous modern slavery statement

Christian Aid expectations for COP25

Christian Aid's key asks for the COP25 climate conference in Madrid, Spain, December 2019. The past 18 months have seen a flurry of new scientific information on the state of the climate. Severe climate impacts are already being experienced, particularly by the poorest and most vulnerable. Communities and ecosystems are already suffering devastation even at the current 1ºC of warming. The fires in the Amazon, Congo and California, the South Asian floods, and other extreme weather events, like cyclones Idai and Fani, point to a climate system already in crisis. The world is in a state of climate emergency. The climate emergency is real and efforts to take action now must be a priority. We call on governments to make a step change in their climate ambition and in the support given to help developing countries achieve it. Key asks Mitigation All countries to recognise the scale of the climate challenge and the need for a fair global effort to achieve the Paris 1.5ºC goal. The Conference of Parties (COP) to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change should deliver a mandate for all countries to enhance the mitigation part of their Nationally-determined contributions (NDCs) in line with the 1.5ºC goal. The common time frame should be in five-year cycles. Long-term strategies should include landscape analyses to plan for nature-based solutions, to increase resilience, and to store and sequester carbon. Finance Adequate climate finance is a prerequisite to greater ambition in poor countries. Developed countries need to step up in providing adequate public finance to both help build resilience, but also to allow clean development and fulfillment – and exceedance - of the conditional parts of the NDCs. Loss and damage The Warsaw International Mechanism on Loss and Damage (WIM) should put greater focus on averting loss and damage than on post-event addressing of it. New, additional and adequate sources of climate finance are needed to enhance action. The potential of nature-based solutions for resilience should be given greater consideration and implementation priority. Adaptation Developing countries should be supported to complete and implement country-driven, gender-responsive, participatory and transparent adaptation plans. The overall financial flows, as well as the proportion of finance for adaptation need to be increased to allow vulnerable people, communities and ecosystems to adapt to the changing climate. Article 6 Rather than rely on ‘flexibility’ mechanisms, countries should instead focus on making transformational changes to their economies. Kyoto credits should play no role in any Paris mechanisms. Article 6 provisions should be adopted as a package. The Article 6 mechanisms should explicitly recognise the non-fungibility of fossil and biological carbon and prevent trade between them. Strong social and environmental safeguards are essential to be agreed before use of flexibility mechanisms. Nature-based solutions COP should recognise the potential co-benefits of nature-based solutions, as detailed in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) reports, and agree means to promote their implementation Nature-based solutions for mitigation should not be seen as an alternative to ending the use of fossil fuels. It should be seen as an additional and precautionary approach, with other co-benefits, including for resilience. Appropriate links with the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) and UN Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD)’s provisions should be made, and coherent implementation encouraged. Gender and Climate The revision must ensure that gender balance approaches are adopted under all the bodies of the convention. Download the full briefing here