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Burundi coffee cooperative

Project status

The latest updates from our In Their Lifetime (ITL) projects around the world, including their duration, focus and financial status.

Below you can read about progress across the three live ITL projects. If you haven't already reviewed the ITL 10 year report, this provides a good overview of the impact of all ITL projects over the past decade. You can view this report here.

A female coffee farmer standing in front of trees in Burundi
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Inclusive coffee markets, Burundi

Duration: July 2014 to August 2019

Focus: Organising 6,000 small-scale farmers into cooperatives and enabling them to take advantage of the market potential of coffee, by improving quality and quantity of production and forging relationships with international buyers.

Bigger picture: Burundi has some of Africa’s best conditions for coffee growing, with its high elevation, rainfall and abundance of Arabica Bourbon trees. Coffee represents 70% of the country’s total exports but sales are still low compared to other countries.

Current status: The project is now coming to a close and the results of an end-of-project evaluation are being reviewed. The monitoring data indicated that there was increased average production to 711 kg (from 432 kg in 2014) per farmer. More details on the evaluation will be shared in the next newsletter.

A group of women wearing blue and red uniforms sitting in a classroom
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Faith leaders against Gender Based Violence, Zimbabwe

Duration: January 2017 – March 2020

Remaining funding requirement: £213,614

Focus: The project is trialling the impact of partnering with faith leaders to tackle gender-based violence (GBV) in Zimbabwe. Working with theological colleges, regional ministers’ forums and women's groups educating on gender equality and the biblical arguments that support it.

Bigger picture: In Zimbabwe, one in three women aged between 18 and 24 experiences sexual violence before she is 18. Given that 80% of men and women in the country claim to belong to a faith organisation, the project represents a significant opportunity to help transform the culture within the country.

Current status: Although GBV prevalence is still high, research conducted earlier in the year shows the proportion of respondents who knew someone who had experienced physical abuse had reduced. This could indicate a decline in cases of GBV within the communities as people become increasingly aware these issues. There was also evidence that faith leaders are making a difference, with the percentage of people acknowledging that community and church leaders were speaking out against GBV rising from 84.3% attained during the baseline survey to 93.4%. The project is into the last six months, and following some disruptions partly due to Cyclone Idai, new partners Evangelical Fellowship of Zimbabwe (EFZ) and Methodist Development and Relief Agency (MEDRA) were brought on board to help keep to the project plan.

Aneesa, who was helped through the ITL project, sits at home with her mother
Aneesa, who was helped through the ITL project, sits at home with her mother
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Access to justice, Afghanistan

Duration: July 2017 – June 2020

Remaining funding requirement: £168,170

Focus: Working with Afghanistan’s two, coexisting legal systems to improve the provision of justice to marginalised citizens in Herat and Badghis districts. If successful, the project could enable the districts’ 300,000 women and men with access to a judicial system in line with human rights.

Bigger picture: It's reported that more than 80% of people in Afghanistan opt to take legal disputes to the local Jirga, the traditional legal system that often issues harsh punishment and excludes women. A recent study by the UN showed that across both modern and traditional judicial systems, only 5% of women’s cases resulted in punishment for the accused.

Current status: Community based human rights committees have been established across the majority of the 90 villages where they are planned. There have been numerous examples of where the CBHRCs have advocated for vulnerable members of the communities. You can read full details of the project in the November newsletter article.