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South Asia Floods

Hundreds have been killed over the last few weeks as monsoon rains devastate countries in South Asia. Strong winds and rain from Cyclone Komen made the situation worse in Myanmar and India. We are responding in several countries. 

Supplies are distributed in Ghotki district

Supplies are distributed in Ghotki district.
Photo credits: Community World Service Asia team members Saleem Dominic and Tassaduq Hussain

We have secured a grant from the UK’s Start Fund that will allow us to reach thousands more vulnerable people across flood affected areas in India and Pakistan.

The death toll rises across India, Pakistan and Myanmar as aid workers reach communities in more remote areas.

Hundreds have been killed and millions affected by widespread flooding across the region caused by the heavy monsoon rains further exacerbated by the passing of Cyclone Komen.

Ram Kishan, our Regional Emergency Manager for South Asia commented that: 'Manipur in southern India was now battling with the worst floods in 200 years’.

Livelihoods have been destroyed as acres of farmland sit submerged under flood water - in Myanmar alone more than 1 million acres of farmland have been flooded, disrupting the planting season and posing risks to longer-term food security.

Myanmar

We are working as members of the ACT Alliance to launch an appeal on the Myanmar Floods. 

We have already released £50,000 to local partners in Myanmar, the Metta Development Foundation and Gender Development Initiative (GDI).

Through our partners we have reached 8,000 people in Chin State and Magway Region providing food clean drinking water and hygiene kits.

In Hakha and Falam (Chin State), landslides have destroyed roads and bridges, wiping out power lines making it difficult to reach those people stranded.

Through our partners GDI and with the support of the Myanmar government, we are using air force helicopters to deliver relief materials to those stranded.

India

We recently received a new grant of £158,000 from UK’s Start Fund, which will help us reach 16,000 of the most vulnerable people in flood-hit areas across India and Pakistan.

Through our partner organisation Indo-Global Social Service Society (IGSSS), we are working in some of the worst affected parts of West Bengal in the east of India, where people are living in the open, without shelter or clean water. 

With this money, IGSSS will be able to provide tarpaulins, mosquito nets, hygiene kits and water purifying equipment to more than 10,000 of West Bengals most affected people, such as Dalits and those with disabled or older family members.

Pakistan

Water bottles ready to distribute in Ghotki districtChristian Aid has made an initial £50,000 available to help victims of the monsoon floods.

Through our partners Community World Service Asia, we have distributed emergency food supplies to more than 100 families in some of the worst affected areas in Sindh province.

The New Start money will allow us to distribute food packs containing flour, cooking oil, lentils, sugar, tea and matches, to a further 6,800 people.

Ram Kishan, Christian Aid’s Regional Emergency Manager for South Asia, said: 'These new and additional funds will allow our Christian Aid and local partners in Pakistan and India to reach thousands of already poor women, men and children who have lost almost everything.'

Neill Garvie, our Pakistan Programme Manager, warned: 'The threat of increased flooding from further monsoon rain, rising flood levels and glacial melt from rising temperatures here is severe, and people are in great need.

'Many still have not recovered from the catastrophic floods of 2010.'

How you can help

We are able to react quickly to emergencies because of the tremendous support we receive from our supporters.

If you would like to help us continue this work, please consider giving to our emergencies fund.

 

 

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